Museums to end entry fees

first_img Museums are to scrap entry fees, following the Natural History Museum’s move to end its £9 adult entry fee.Museums to offer universal free admission once again, following the decision by the trustees of the Natural History Museum to scrap the £9 adult entry fee. The National Maritime Museum then announced a few hours later that it will also no longer charge an entry fee from December 2001.The move to scrap entry fees follows the announcement in the government’s Budget that museums will be able to reclaim VAT. Until now only museums that charged could reclaim VAT. Advertisement Read Museums to scrap entry charges by Maev Kennedy, Arts and heritage correspondent, at The Guardian. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Museums to end entry fees About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.  14 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 23 May 2001 | Newslast_img read more

A BETTER SOLUTION THAN TRUMP’S BORDER WALL

first_imgA BETTER SOLUTION THAN TRUMP’S BORDER WALLwritten by Ron Paul who is an American author, physician, and former politician.Just one week in office, President Trump is already following through on his pledge to address illegal immigration. His January 25th executive order called for the construction of a wall along the entire length of the U.S.-Mexico border. While he is right to focus on the issue, there are several reasons why his proposed solution will unfortunately not lead us anywhere closer to solving the problem.First, the wall will not work. Texas already started building a border fence about ten years ago. It divided people from their own property across the border, it deprived people of their land through the use of eminent domain, and in the end the problem of drug and human smuggling was not solved.Second, the wall will be expensive. The wall is estimated to cost between 12 and 15 billion dollars. You can bet it will be more than that. President Trump has claimed that if the Mexican government doesn’t pay for it, he will impose a 20 percent duty on products imported from Mexico. Who will pay this tax? Ultimately, the American consumer, as the additional costs will be passed on. This will of course hurt the poorest Americans the most.Third, building a wall ignores the real causes of illegal border crossings into the United States. Though President Trump is right to prioritize the problem of border security, he misses the point on how it can be done effectively and at an actual financial benefit to the country rather than a huge economic drain.The solution to really addressing the problem of illegal immigration, drug smuggling, and the threat of cross-border terrorism is clear: remove the welfare magnet that attracts so many to cross the border illegally, stop the 25 year U.S. war in the Middle East, and end the drug war that incentivizes smugglers to cross the border.The various taxpayer-funded programs that benefit illegal immigrants in the United States, such as direct financial transfers, medical benefits, food assistance, and education, cost an estimated $100 billion dollars per year. That is a significant burden on citizens and legal residents. The promise of free money, free food, free education, and free medical care if you cross the border illegally is a powerful incentive for people to do so. It especially makes no sense for the United States government to provide these services to those who are not in the U.S. legally.Likewise, the 40 year war on drugs has produced no benefit to the American people at a great cost. It is estimated that since President Nixon declared a war on drugs, the US has spent more than a trillion dollars to fight what is a losing battle. That is because just as with the welfare magnet, there is an enormous incentive to smuggle drugs into the United States.We already know the effect that ending the war on drugs has on illegal smuggling: as more and more U.S. states decriminalize marijuana for medical and recreational uses, marijuana smuggling from Mexico to the U.S. has dropped by 50 percent from 2010.Finally, the threat of terrorists crossing into the United States from Mexico must be taken seriously, however once again we must soberly consider why they may seek to do us harm. We have been dropping bombs on the Middle East since at least 1990. Last year President Obama dropped more than 26,000 bombs. Thousands of civilians have been killed in U.S. drone attacks. The grand U.S.plan to “remake” the Middle East has produced only misery, bloodshed, and terrorism. Ending this senseless intervention will go a long way toward removing the incentive to attack the United States.I believe it is important for the United States to have secure borders, but unfortunately President Trump’s plan to build a wall will end up costing a fortune while ignoring the real problem of why people cross the borders illegally. They will keep coming as long as those incentives remain.FOOTNOTE: Ron Paul is an American author, physician, and former politician. He was formerly the U.S. Representative for Texas’ 14th and 22nd congressional districts.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

BHP to sell its Mt. Arthur thermal coal mine in Australia

first_imgBHP to sell its Mt. Arthur thermal coal mine in Australia FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Reuters:The world’s largest mining company BHP Group has hired Macquarie Bank and JP Morgan to sell its Australian thermal coal mine, three sources said, as miners face increasing pressure to reduce their exposure to fossil fuels.BHP’s Mt Arthur open cut mine, in the Hunter Valley region of New South Wales, supplies thermal coal used as fuel for power plants, to domestic and international customers. Prices have tumbled this year, slashing BHP’s likely sale price to less than $1 billion, two banking sources said.BHP previously said that the thermal coal business is a very small part of their portfolio, contributing about 3% of turnover and said in February that if a good offer came along they would be willing to sell.Activist investor Elliott, which holds a 4.7% stake in the mining company, has pushed for the sale of BHP’s thermal coal assets, which include one third of the Cerrejon mine in Colombia. BHP has also been pressured by green groups and some shareholders to leave any industry associations with policies that fail to match the company’s support for the 2015 Paris climate accord.Rival mining companies have also taken steps to go thermal coal free, with Rio Tinto selling its last coal mines in 2018, and Anglo American considering the spinoff or sale of its South African coal operations within the next two or three years.There is a handful of companies including Australia’s Whitehaven Coal Ltd, China’s Yancoal and India’s Adani Enterprises that have expressed interest in the Mt Arthur mine, the sources said.[Clara Denina, Melanie Burton and Zandi Shabalala]More: BHP puts Australian thermal coal mine up for sale: sourceslast_img read more