Tourism dept to renovate upgrade lodges to 3star properties

first_imgKolkata: The state Tourism department will soon commence a large-scale renovation work of around 1,000 rooms of its lodging properties across the state and upgrade them to three star categories.State Tourism minister Goutam Deb on Wednesday said the work for upgrade will start in July and work will be carried out in phases and on a rotational basis to avoid inconvenience of tourists during this time phase.”Work is expected to be completed by September before the Puja season. There will not be a complete shutdown of these lodging facilities at the time of work, Also Read – Heavy rain hits traffic, flightsbut some of the facilities will remain non-functional during this period. The first phase of work will include 25 properties.” Deb said.It may be mentioned that from July to September, when renovation work will be undergoing, bookings for some lodges have to be doneoffline.The online booking will be available partially and the department will offer discount to attract tourists.In most tourist destinations, this three-month period is a lean period owing to the monsoon. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killedThe department has plans of installing kiosks in the lobbies of the lodging facilities, while handicrafts from the Micro Small and Medium enterprises (MSME) will be on display for sale including processed food items depending on the demographical location of the lodges.”In forest areas or some hill destinations, the tourists have to remain indoor as they hardly have activities after a certain point of time. We will be promoting cultural programmes highlighting the folk culture to entertain the tourists in these lodges,” a senior official said.The minister further added that Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee had handed over the responsibility to undertake development work of the Pathasathi shelters.A senior Tourism department official maintained that there may be a slight rise in the tariff after the rooms are refurbished but the facilities the tourists will be getting will be the best.last_img read more

What Entrepreneurs Can Learn from Borders Demise

first_imgOut of touch with trends. The world of books has changed radically in recent years. Shoppers aren’t just buying more online; they’re buying e-books, too. Yet Borders never developed a strong online presence. Like struggling Blockbuster, their industry shifted, but Borders didn’t. Lagging on technology. As books became digitized and were increasingly loaded onto e-readers, Borders did nothing. All the while, archrival Barnes & Noble was also struggling, but it at least attracted a buyout offer in large part by developing the Nook. min read Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Underutilization of assets. So they had these vast bookstores — but what happened in them? Borders could have made them a livelier place with book-group discussions, maybe issue-focused debates, or late-night bands playing in those coffee bars. Perhaps cooking demonstrations surrounding cookbook releases? They had all that room. But not enough was done to make Borders a must-visit destination that was entertaining rather than just a big cavern full of books. Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global If you’re like me, you can remember when the first Borders bookstore opened in your town.I thought: what a big, luxurious-feeling bookstore…with a coffeehouse inside, too. By 2010, the company had more than 250 stores in the U.S., about 10,000 employees worldwide and sales had mushroomed to $2.3 billion.Independent bookstores feared the mega-bookstore chain. Wags said it was the beginning of the end of the independent bookstore. And Hollywood even made a movie out of it: Remember Meg Ryan’s Shop Around the Corner in the 1998 film You’ve Got Mail?My how the mighty have fallen.Now, Borders is history — its nearly 400 remaining stores are being liquidated. But the American Booksellers Association reports more than 1,200 independent bookstores are still open.How did it all go wrong for Borders? Here are four reasons why the once-colossal chain went bust:center_img Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. Why do you think Borders went under? Leave a comment and let us know.   Big stores = big rents = high risk. Megastores can only survive on huge traffic volumes. So when customers took to the Web with greater frequency, the giant bookstore business model began to erode. Independent bookstores mostly have much smaller rents to pay, so they can better withstand this migration. Even Best Buy is now renting out store space to small businesses to pay its rent. July 21, 2011 Register Now »last_img read more

Rice U system selectively sequesters toxins from water

first_img Return to article. Long Description Rice University postdoctoral researcher Kuichang Zuo holds an assembled test unit of the lab’s ionic water-treatment technology, which selectively removes hazardous contaminants and ignores those that are harmless. (Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University) Share2NEWS RELEASEEditor’s note: Links to high-resolution images for download appear at the end of this release.David [email protected] [email protected] U. system selectively sequesters toxins from waterEngineers develop technology to pull specific contaminants from drinking and wastewater, pipelinesHOUSTON – (Aug. 6, 2018) – Rice University scientists are developing technology to remove contaminants from water – but only as many as necessary. http://news.rice.edu/files/2018/08/0806_SULFATE-5-WEB-1utuam1.jpgRice University postdoctoral researcher Kuichang Zuo holds an assembled test units for the lab’s ionic water-treatment technology, which selectively removes hazardous contaminants and ignores those that are harmless. (Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University)Located on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation’s top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is home to the Baker Institute for Public Policy. With 3,970 undergraduates and 2,934 graduate students, Rice’s undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is just under 6-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice is ranked No. 1 for quality of life and for lots of race/class interaction and No. 2 for happiest students by the Princeton Review. Rice is also rated as a best value among private universities by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance. To read “What they’re saying about Rice,” go to http://tinyurl.com/RiceUniversityoverview. Contaminants can be removed from fluids that traverse a maze-like path between electrodes in a technology developed by Rice University engineers. The photo shows Rice postdoctoral researcher Kuichang Zuo placing a separator that channels water through the system. (Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University) Contaminants can be removed from fluids that traverse a maze-like path between electrodes in a technology developed by Rice University engineers. The photo shows Rice postdoctoral researcher Kuichang Zuo placing a separator that channels water through the system. (Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University) http://news.rice.edu/files/2018/08/0806_SULFATE-4-WEB-1pfygaf.jpgContaminants can be removed from fluids that traverse a maze-like path between electrodes in a technology developed by Rice University engineers. The photo shows separators that channel water through the system. (Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University) AddThis Rice University postdoctoral researcher Kuichang Zuo holds an assembled test unit of the lab’s ionic water-treatment technology, which selectively removes hazardous contaminants and ignores those that are harmless. (Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University) Rice University researchers are developing ionic water-treatment technology that saves money and energy by selectively removing only hazardous contaminants and ignoring those that are harmless. From left: Kuichang Zuo, Qilin Li, Amit Jain and Rafael Verduzco. (Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University) Return to article. Long DescriptionRice postdoctoral researcher Kuichang Zuo places a separator that channels water through the system. Photo by Jeff FitlowThe Rice team is developing coatings for other contaminants and working with labs at the University of Texas at El Paso and Arizona State University on large-scale test systems. Zuo said it should also be possible to scale systems down for in-home water purification.Rice graduate students Jun Kim and Amit Jain are co-lead authors of the paper. Co-authors include Tianxiao Wang, a Rice graduate student; Rafael Verduzco, associate professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering and of materials science and nanoengineering; and Mingce Long, an associate professor at China’s Shanghai Jiao Tong University.The research was supported by the Rice-based, National Science Foundation-backed Center for Nanotechnology-Enabled Water Treatment, the Welch Foundation and the Shanghai Municipal International Cooperation Foundation.-30-Read the abstract at https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acs.est.8b01868.Follow Rice News and Media Relations via Twitter @RiceUNews.Related materials:Qilin Li Research Group: http://qilinli.rice.eduVerduzco Laboratory: http://verduzcolab.blogs.rice.eduCenter for Nanotechnology-Enabled Water Treatment: http://www.newtcenter.orgRice Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering: https://ceve.rice.eduRice Department of Materials Science and NanoEngineering: https://msne.rice.eduRice Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering: https://chbe.rice.eduImages for download:Long Description http://news.rice.edu/files/2018/08/0806_SULFATE-3-WEB-2hajrg6.jpgRice University researchers are developing ionic water-treatment technology that saves money and energy by selectively removing only hazardous contaminants and ignoring those that are harmless. From left: Kuichang Zuo, Qilin Li, Amit Jain and Rafael Verduzco. (Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University) http://news.rice.edu/files/2018/08/0806_SULFATE-2-WEB-2k8wyde.jpgIn Rice University’s new water-treatment platform, electrode coatings can be swapped out to allow the device to selectively remove a range of contaminants from wastewater, drinking water and industrial fluids. In tests, an engineered coating of resin, polymer and activated carbon removed and trapped harmful sulfate ions and allow most common salt ions to pass by. (Credit: Illustration by Kuichang Zuo/Rice University) Return to article. Long DescriptionRice University postdoctoral researcher Kuichang Zuo holds an assembled test unit of the lab’s ionic water-treatment technology. Photo by Jeff FitlowThe Rice lab of engineer Qilin Li is building a treatment system that can be tuned to selectively pull toxins from drinking water and wastewater from factories, sewage systems and oil and gas wells. The researchers said their technology will cut costs and save energy compared to conventional systems.“Traditional methods to remove everything, such as reverse osmosis, are expensive and energy intensive,” said Li, the lead scientist and co-author of a study about the new technology in the American Chemical Society journal Environmental Science & Technology. “If we figure out a way to just fish out these minor components, we can save a lot of energy.”The heart of Rice’s system is a set of novel composite electrodes that enable capacitive deionization. The charged, porous electrodes selectively pull target ions from fluids passing through the maze-like system. When the pores get filled with toxins, the electrodes can be cleaned, restored to their original capacity and reused.“This is part of a broad scope of research to figure out ways to selectively remove ionic contaminants,” said Li, a professor of civil and environmental engineering and of materials science and nanoengineering. “There are a lot of ions in water. Not everything is toxic. For example, sodium chloride (salt) is perfectly benign. We don’t have to remove it unless the concentration gets too high.In tests, an engineered coating of resin, polymer and activated carbon removed and trapped harmful sulfate ions, and other coatings can be used in the same platform to target other contaminants. Illustration by Kuichang Zuo“For many applications, we can leave non-hazardous ions behind, but there are certain ions that we need to remove,” she said. “For example, in some drinking water wells, there’s arsenic. In our drinking water pipes, there could be lead or copper. And in industrial applications, there are calcium and sulfate ions that form scale, a buildup of mineral deposits that foul and clog pipes.”The proof-of-principal system developed by Li’s team removed sulfate ions, a scale-forming mineral that can give water a bitter taste and act as a laxative. The system’s electrodes were coated with activated carbon, which was in turn coated by a thin film of tiny resin particles held together by quaternized polyvinyl alcohol. When sulfate-contaminated water flowed through a channel between the charged electrodes, sulfate ions were attracted by the electrodes, passed through the resin coating and stuck to the carbon. In Rice University’s new water-treatment platform, electrode coatings can be swapped out to allow the device to selectively remove a range of contaminants from wastewater, drinking water and industrial fluids. In tests, an engineered coating of resin, polymer and activated carbon removed and trapped harmful sulfate ions and allow most common salt ions to pass by. Return to article. Long Description Return to article. Long DescriptionIn Rice’s new water-treatment platform, electrode coatings can be swapped out to allow the device to selectively remove a range of contaminants from wastewater, drinking water and industrial fluids.Illustration by Kuichang ZuoTests in the Rice lab showed the positively charged coating on the cathode preferentially captured sulfate ions over salt at a ratio of more than 20 to 1.The electrodes retained their properties over 50 cycles. “But in fact, in the lab, we’ve run the system for several hundred cycles and I don’t see any breaking or peeling of the material,” said Kuichang Zuo, lead author of the paper and a postdoctoral researcher in Li’s lab. “It’s very robust.”Li said the system is intended to work with current commercial water-treatment systems. “The true merit of this work is not that we were able to selectively remove sulfate, because there are many other contaminants that are perhaps more important,” she said. “The merit is that we developed a technology platform that we can use to target other contaminants as well by varying the composition of the electrode coating.” http://news.rice.edu/files/2018/08/0806_SULFATE-1-WEB-290slvm.jpgRice University’s new platform technology can selectively filter contaminants from wastewater, drinking water and industrial fluids. In tests, an engineered coating of resin, polymer and activated carbon removed and trapped harmful sulfate ions, and other coatings can be used in the same platform to target other contaminants. (Credit: Illustration by Kuichang Zuo/Rice University)Long Description Return to article. Long Descriptionlast_img read more