NA Nurses Hostel goes up in flames

first_imgThe Nurses Hostel at Charles Place, New Amsterdam, was on Saturday destroyed by fire of unknown origin.The building opposite the old New Amsterdam Hospital was not occupied at the time of the fire but has been aThe 50-year-old building on firelandmark for the 270-year-old town.Reports are that about 13:30h smoke was seem emanating from the upper flat of the two-storied building, which is more than 50 years old, and was previously used as nurses quarters.An eyewitness told Guyana Times that after smoke was seen in the building the fire service, a mere three minutes away, was summoned.Firemen initially encountered problems acquiring water and as such sought help from the Rosehall Estate Fire truck. Firefighters took under fifteen minutes to contain the blaze and were able to prevent it from spreading.Meanwhile, this newspaper was told that the building is at times occupied by vagrants.The building, which was used to accommodate nurses who live in remote areas but attached to the NA Hospital, was closed about a decade ago.Two weeks ago the first step to rehabilitate the building was taken when contractors were asked to submit estimates to rehabilitate the building. On Saturday, one midwife Marilyn Tinnie, who once stayed at the hostel, expressed regret over the destruction of the building. Investigations are continuing.last_img read more

49ers mailbag: ‘Why is nobody questioning the coaching?’

first_imgSANTA CLARA — A year ago, the 49ers were 1-10. Now, they’re 2-9. Progress! If that’s not enough to soothe 49ers fans, here is a Tuesday morning mailbag:Don’t you think that coming off a bye, playing against one of the worst Ds in recent memory, the 49ers should have been much better prepared? I know the talent is not there (GM!?), but why is nobody questioning the coaching aside from Saleh (it seems)? (@Nik_8686)Very valid points. Kyle Shanahan heaped blamed on himself — and all 49ers — for …last_img

11 days agoBen Hirsch’s incredible journey from Clifton Hill to Getafe

first_imgBen Hirsch’s incredible journey from Clifton Hill to Getafeby Chris Sermeno11 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveIt’s game day, and you’re dressed from head to toe in team apparel, thinking of the game that lies ahead… The team bus is pulling into the stadium while crowds of fans mob the entrance, clamouring over each other with cameras and phones in hope of catching a glimpse of their idols through the windows. After a briefing in the change rooms, you lace up your brand new, personalised boots and take to the lush green pitch with your teammates, standing side by side while the adoring public chants and cheers, the spotlights flood the stadium with a brilliant white light for the game that awaits.What would it be like to be a world class footballer? We dream of what we would do with the money, the fame, the global outreach and the millions of adoring fans.While football is enjoyed by millions across the world, few really understand the hard work, career deciding choices and life altering sacrifices that’s required to make it to the professional scene. Australian footballer Ben Hirsch experienced the tough side of football that many of us don’t see. His stories from the humble suburbs of Melbourne to the cutthroat nature of the Spanish system has changed my views of becoming a professional footballer.-I was lucky enough to sit with Ben Hirsh for nearly two hours talking all things football. Apart from being a humble person, his insight and experience was rather unique, and relatable for a lot of young footballers.Ben was a reserved teen playing for Clifton Hill in the lower state tiers of Australian football. Granted, it’s better than your average Sunday league, but hardly of substance for those wanting to make huge leaps and bounds in the world of football. Ben was playing as a reliable left back for his side when he was scouted to train and play at a football academy in Madrid. As with any young player, a move to Europe for football sounds like a dream. In Ben’s case, the dream wouldn’t wait, he was asked to board a plane just a few days later.The two years that would follow had it all, the facilities, the first team treatment, the nerves and challenges of experiencing a new country that he wasn’t familiar with, injuries, and everything you can possibly imagine with being a pro footballer. His introduction to Spain was, in true Spanish fashion, rather direct and blunt. His chauffeur had nothing to go by but a picture of Ben, and they were unable to communicate due to the language barrier. His nerves were high as the driver took him to meet his agent.”Ready to train?”Sure enough, straight off a long flight to Madrid, an unfamiliar cab ride and he was still expected to come dressed to his first training session. There was no sympathy for jet lag, or culture shock. As an aspiring athlete you aren’t afforded such luxuries as a break like the international players.Ben recalls fond memories of his time at the academy, where his teammates welcomed him as one of their own. The share housing filled with aspiring footballers from around the world and local footballers trying to work their way up the Spanish system.”A few of them spoke English so I got to know them pretty well. It was like a family, we’d train together, eat together, live together. Everyone was always on the path for the same goal, to become a professional footballer and we all encouraged each other to keep playing our best and striving for more.”Language was one of the first barriers to overcome. Having come straight from Australia, Ben had no time to pick up any lessons or study beforehand, and it was lucky for him that some of his academy mates were able to converse with him, and make life a little more welcoming for the Aussie expat. The academy held a unique element of unity, which is something Ben was grateful for. Having been baptised in a myriad of uncertainty and unfamiliarity, his teammates were all very understanding of Ben’s disposition. Fortunately, private tutoring helped him to pick up the language and he was able to adapt to his surroundings a little more.I shifted the conversation slightly, and asked Ben “¿Todavía entiendes español?” (Do you still understand Spanish?)As it turns out his Spanish is still very good, we had a short exchange in another language. It’s almost funny how language, like sport, has the power to unite people.On the tactical side of things, Ben needed some time to adjust to the Spanish way of football. Stylistically, it flows much quicker, players are required to control the ball the same way in any scenario. The pace is highlighted by the understanding of both the system that was implemented and the players to execute the plan, regardless of their position or physical ability. “I felt like a fish out of water, at first not knowing much Spanish, then having to try and fit into a new team culture and system. “It took me a while to get used to, training up to 5 times a week doing tactics, drills, running and game play all on different days, as well as match days. There was no resting, or time to absorb the local culture when I first got there.”His teammates and opposition came from reaches around the world, however Ben humbly expressed how well he performed against some players that had taken to the international stage. “There were some internationally capped players, one in particular from the Republic of Congo who had a lot of fanfare about him. I marked on him for a game, and I almost had a laugh to myself about how this kid from Clifton Hill was playing against an international youngster, and did a pretty damn good job too.”Ben’s time with the academy was slowly coming to an end, and he was under the impression he would be jetting back to Australia with some overseas experience under his belt. As football takes its twists and turns, it was around the same time former Copa del Rey runners up Getafe CF came knocking.His parents joined him in Madrid for a few days, unbeknownst to all that he was about to be offered a 2 year contract with the La Liga outfit that same week. He signed a 2 year senior contract on the day of his late uncle’s birthday, which struck an emotional chord for him as his uncle was a passionate sports fan.”It felt like a dream, I had my parents in Spain with me, I got a shirt with my name on it, I couldn’t really believe this was happening for me. It felt like such a huge shift from the state leagues in Victoria to be training in Spain, then signing for Getafe.”From his academy and his roommates, he was thrust into his first professional environment at Getafe. He details the things that made it feel like the dream had become reality.”It’s the things like walking through the change room, getting treated by first team medical staff, stuff like that which makes you feel like you’re a part of something big.”We trained on top of the hill at the training grounds, and down below you could often see the first team training. Sometimes we’d be lucky to finish early and watch them train, and it was like nothing I’ve ever seen before. “They’d come up to us later, knowing we were the reserves and take time to say hello and get to know us a little bit.”As most footballing careers sound dreamy, this is where the hard yards kicked in for Ben.Unlike his time at the academy, Getafe is a professional outfit and the expectations were much higher. In terms of the team chemistry, Ben recalls it being a much harsher environment than his academy teammates. “It was much harsher. They weren’t exclusive or anything, but there’s this element of competition for places because for these guys, it was their career they’d worked hard for, or it was their means of making a living. They weren’t going to give up their spot without a fight.”As for many La Liga sides, their reserves play in lower tiers of the Spanish football pyramid. Ben tried as he might to get into the first team but stumbling blocks along the way slowly dissolved his love for the game. The difference in the culture and environment was easily the biggest difference, despite the academy and Getafe both being based in Madrid. The weight of expectation slowly began to play on his mental health. He credits his relationship at the time being one of the stable elements of his life during his footballing career. “This is the main reason I wanted to get my story out there. I didn’t realise until later on how much this was playing on my mental health. I was anxious, had bouts of depression because week in, week out you’re pouring in your blood, sweat and tears, only to find out you weren’t on the team sheet. But you’d do it all again the following week.”I played a few minutes in a game, maybe once a month if I was lucky. It was so tough, putting in all this effort for the chance to be involved. My girlfriend at the time was probably the best thing about my life. She was able to help me through some of the feelings and emotions I’d gone through, and if it wasn’t for her I probably would’ve had some sort of break down or gone home earlier, who knows.”It was an injury that lead to Ben questioning his future. A hamstring injury put him out for the better part of a few weeks, in which time he could finally relax and enjoy his surroundings, something he had lacked while living the tough life of a professional athlete. “The physio spoke English and she was really nice, it felt good getting treated by the first team doctors and being around the first team facilities. I wasn’t training for a while, so I got to go out and experience the city a little more.”I was wearing my Getafe tracksuit, and an older man saw me in the street, and he was thrilled to meet me. He asked how my leg was, said that I’ve got some talent and he can’t wait to see me play. It’s those sorts of moments that take away the hard yards a little bit and make you feel like a pro.”Ben made the most of his injury and took his first trip back home to Melbourne since leaving for the academy. Spending time in the unforgiving but glorious Australian summer, he realised what was most important to him, which was taking care of his mental health and spending time with his loved ones.”I simply couldn’t do that if I were to pursue being a footballer abroad. My mental health was suffering, and I didn’t realise until I’d spent time with family and realised what I was missing back home.”I went back to Madrid soon after and the manager agreed to let me go out on loan, but my mind was decided. I was ready to return home. My experiences were amazing, and I’m forever grateful for them, but evaluating what I truly believe to be best was to be back home.”After a long and arduous 2 years in Madrid, Ben finally returned to Melbourne. His life and career experiences have helped to shape him as a mentor as he manages Manningham’s under 16 side in the state leagues of Victoria, the same leagues he once played in at a similar age.”These days I love coaching and developing the next wave of players. Given my experience in Spain, I can play that big brother role for some of these younger guys, telling them what it takes to play in Europe and helping them to be the best they can be.”These days, Ben works in the family’s business of a winery, while continuing to manage and be involved in football at a coaching level. He hopes to one day move up in Victoria’s footballing world as a manager, but for now he’s content with life, and continues practicing his Spanish.Que viva la vida. TagsTransfersOpinionAbout the authorChris SermenoShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

APTN News Sunday Healing by the Sacred Fire

first_img(A late afternoon sun shines down on the common grounds in Maliotenam. Photo: Tom Fennario/APTN)Tom Fennario APTN News SundayIn the centre of the teepee, a Sacred Fire burns.Some cedar is thrown on and the flames that leap out light the face of a middle-aged woman who is crying.She speaks Innu to the 20 people packed in around her.At one point, the French word for suicide is spoken.“There’s not really a word for suicide in Innu,” says Pepameshke Maikan, an Innu elder who is a part of the medicine society.“We can say ‘take one’s life’ but for many years suicide has been a taboo topic. In the old days there used to not be any suicide.”(Sacred Fire Keeper Pepameshke Maikan. Photo: Tom Fennario/APTN)Maikan is one of the people in charge of the sacred fire that is burning just outside the hearings for the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Women and Girls (MMIWG) in Maliotenam First Nation.He is here to perform healing ceremonies for anyone who so requires it.On this morning, he uses a feather fan to push the smoke of the sacred fire towards the crying woman, who wails in pain.“It’s a way to purify and to put some of that medicine inside of her,” Maikan explains“The smoke comes from a sacred fire, and medicine has been burned inside of the fire.”Maikan gently taps the crying woman with his feather fan until her sobbing subsides.“Kuei,” he says to her, the Innu word for hello, and suddenly she laughs.The tension in the teepee dissipates for the moment.But judging from just a fraction of the 60 truths heard at the MMIWG hearings this week, there’s a lot more healing that needs to be done.* * *“I can tell you about women who have been raped, but it’s taboo. Women who have been raped and experienced incest,” testified Jeanette Pilot, an Innu woman from Uashat.“At 25 years old I found my boyfriend hanging, he sent me off on an errand and when I came back he was hanging,” testified Jenny Régis, also from Uashat.“We’ve had several suicides in the community, and most those happen when people experience sexual assault,” testified Lise Jourdain of Maliotenam.“Everybody is aware here of what goes on in our community, everybody knows that there has been a complaint against our chief for sexual misconduct, nobody should hide that.”The chief in question is Mike McKenzie, who has refused to step down from his duties while he awaits the verdict in his trial for three counts of sexually assaulting a minor.He declined to speak to APTN News for this story.“I would like to convey a message to my community, to all the men of my community,” Jourdain said near the conclusion of her testimony“Do something. By the grace of God, do something. When women meet up, and we try to work on the healing, men don’t come. Men don’t show up.”* * *The next day at the sacred fire, Lucien St-Onge of Maliotenam nods when he has Jourdain’s call for action repeated to him.“There’s a women’s shelter here, but eventually they go back to the men that abuse them and the circle begins again. It’s pointless if they’re just going to go back to the same bad situation.“We need a centre for men too, and not just for them to go be by themselves and be miserable, but a centre where men can go with their families to get well, get better together,” says St-Onge.Gaëtan Régis is also sitting by the sacred fire.He says the solution isn’t to be found so much in the community as back out on the land.“A couple of years ago we brought some [high school] dropouts out on to the land to live traditionally during salmon season. You could see how it helped them, how they absorbed it, how the land heals.”Nitassinan is what the Innu call their vast territory which stretches across the north shore region of Quebec, hugging the coastline along the Gulf of the St.Lawrence before shooting up north into parts of Labrador.Ten communities dot the rolling landscape, the biggest of which (with a combined population of nearly 3,000) are the sister communities of Uashat and Maliotenam, which sit about 15 km apart and are governed by the same band council.Uashat lies just adjacent to the city of Sept-Îles, while Maliotenam sits up on a hill not far from the river. Spoken of by elders around the sacred fire neither community seems to evoke much fondness.Maliotenam has the distinction of being a traditional summer settlement…but also hosted a residential school from 1952-1967.* * *The Innu word for thank you loosely translates as “I give you a goose”, which says a lot about their culture.They hunt caribou, trap small game, and many, due to their proximity to the vast St.Lawrence, are deft fisherman.Pepameshke Maikan, whose name translates as “travelling wolf”, says it was explained to him at a young age that the Innu weren’t meant to be settled into sedentary homes.“I remember when I was about ten years old my father brought me to a mountain where we could see our community,” Maikan explains while smoking tobacco in his pipe.“And he said, pointing at the cemetery ‘look, my bones will go there,’ and he turned to the west and he said ‘the bones of your grandparents are in the forest. Will you leave the bones of your grandparents?’ I said ‘never’.“It was then I became a land protector.”Maikain is in his 70’s now and has spent decades travelling the Innu communities speaking and performing healing ceremonies.“I used to ask myself if the job [of healing] is too immense, I asked my mother once, ‘what am I doing wrong?” and she said ‘nothing, all these things have happened, it’s going to take time, it’s going to take a lot of time, it’s not going to happen the day after tomorrow, with the wounds we have, with intergenerational trauma.”Maikan pauses, to smoke his pipe and reflect.“I’m proud of what’s happening here now in Uashat and Maliotenam, I see here there are people that follow their ceremonies, they have the knowledge to do so.“We have young people who are sun dancers, who are a part of the medicine society, who do the rain dance. Young people who work for healing,” he explains.“It’s like mushrooms, what we’re doing here is like throwing spores in the air.”* * *On the next day of hearings, the teepee is again packed.An Innu song is sung, another woman can be heard crying from the outside.At the end of the song, the drum is hit five times for each direction, 20 in total, as is the Innu tradition.By the time the last beat is played, the sobbing has faded.last_img read more

FDA goal to be first on devices worries former regulators

first_imgWASHINGTON — Dr. Jeffrey Shuren was adamant: The United States would never cut corners to fast-track the approval of medical devices.“We don’t use our people as guinea pigs in the U.S.,” Shuren said, holding firm as the new director of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s medical devices division.Again and again in 2011 — four times in all — Shuren was summoned before Congress. Lawmakers accused the agency of being too slow and too demanding in reviewing new devices like heart valves and spinal implants, driving U.S. manufacturers overseas where products faced less rigorous review. Each time, he pushed back.And yet the next year, Shuren and his team adopted an approach that surprised even some of his closest colleagues: The FDA would strive to be “first in the world” to approve devices it considered important to public health.The agency’s shift mirrored the talking points of the $400 billion medical device industry — a lobbying behemoth on Capitol Hill — and ushered in a series of changes that critics say have allowed manufacturers to seek regulatory approval for high-risk devices using smaller, shorter, less rigorous studies that provide less certainty of safety and effectiveness.Under Shuren, annual new device approvals have more than tripled, while warnings to device manufacturers about product safety and quality issues have fallen roughly 80 per cent, an Associated Press investigation found.The FDA says warning letters have declined because the agency is using a new approach that involves fewer warnings but more inspections to oversee companies that violate its rules.The cheaper and faster medical device approvals began despite multiple high-profile problems involving pelvic mesh, hip replacements and other implants.An AP analysis of FDA data shows that since 2012, tens of thousands of injury and death reports have been filed in connection with devices that were cleared through a streamlined pathway that minimizes clinical trial testing. The FDA’s system for reporting device problems often includes incomplete, unverified information submitted by manufacturers, physicians, lawyers and patients. Because of these limitations, it’s often unclear whether a device played any role in an injury or death.In response to questions from the AP, the FDA said its “first in the world” goal was adopted as part of a broader strategy that also focused on quickly identifying defective products to ensure U.S. devices “remain safe, effective and of high quality,” the agency added.The goal is not about a competition between countries, the FDA said, but rather a response to concerns about delays in new technologies reaching U.S. patients.Last week, the FDA announced a new goal to be “consistently first” among the world’s regulatory agencies to identify and address medical device safety issues. And on Monday, a day after a global investigation into medical device safety began publishing, the FDA proposed changes that would push manufacturers to incorporate more up-to-date technology into their devices — reforms that could take years to implement.The agency also rejected the idea that Shuren’s approach to regulation has changed over time, saying he has worked for years to improve patient safety.Still, some current and former FDA officials are worried about the ambition to be first on approvals. They include Dr. Peter Lurie, who calls the agency’s direction “an invitation to a race to the bottom for scientific standards” seemingly prompted by industry pressure. Lurie held senior posts at FDA from 2009 to 2017 and now heads the non-profit Center for Science in the Public Interest.The FDA’s medical device standards are still considered among the highest in the world. But by trying to outpace countries with less stringent requirements, Lurie said the FDA has opened the door to lowering its own standards to achieve its goal.Earlier this year, Shuren addressed a conference of medical device industry executives, each of whom paid about $1,000 to attend.Armed with dozens of PowerPoint slides, he explained how the FDA was approving more new devices in less time and credited his “north star” — the FDA’s goal to be first to approve new devices.He highlighted the agency’s new focus on “customer service,” including streamlining clinical trials.“We all know that premarket clinical trials can be very costly, very time-consuming and, in some respects, of limited value,” Shuren said.He explained that the FDA was now using easier-to-produce data to approve a variety of devices, including artery-opening stents, spinal implants and diagnostic tests.In September, the FDA began codifying a concept called “acceptable uncertainty” in draft guidelines for manufacturers. The proposal would ease pre-market testing standards for some devices, in exchange for companies conducting larger follow-up studies, even though the FDA’s own data show that many studies are not completed until five or more years after approval.The FDA said in a statement that all devices carry a level of uncertainty, even after extensive testing. It said its guidance focuses on “breakthrough” devices, where “it may be appropriate to accept a little more uncertainty,” while still meeting FDA standards.Lurie and other former regulators worry that the FDA is laying the groundwork for a “sliding scale” of medical evidence that will leave patients even more uncertain about the safety and effectiveness of devices.“This guidance is basically a ‘come hither’ to industry, inviting them to ask FDA for the lower standards of evidence,” he said.___Follow Matthew Perrone at @AP_FDAwriter___Associated Press writers Holbrook Mohr, Reese Dunklin and Meghan Hoyer contributed to this story.Matthew Perrone, The Associated Presslast_img read more

Ryan Pomeroy named one of Canadas Top 40 Under 40

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – Ryan Pomeroy, a native of Fort St. John and President of Pomeroy Lodging, has been named one of Canada’s Top 40 Under 40.The awards, which are bestowed upon forty Canadian business leaders under 40 years of age, are chosen by an independent advisory board, which comprises more than 20 respected and experienced individuals from across Canada. Nearly 800 residents were nominated for the awards between January and March before the board met on May 15th to select the Honourees from a short list put together by Caldwell.Ryan Pomeroy, who currently serves as President of Pomeroy Lodging, was announced today as one of the forty recipients this year. Originally from Fort St. John, he began his journey at Pomeroy Lodging at a very young age. Having worked in the family business since he was five, Pomeroy was appointed the company’s President in 2006. Since then, the company says he has been instrumental in strategically positioning Pomeroy Lodging for continued success and growth. Pomeroy Lodging President Ryan Pomeroy. Photo by Pomeroy Lodging“I offer my sincere congratulations to the 2018 honourees,” said Elan Pratzer, managing partner for Canada at Caldwell. “It’s easy to understand why we recognize and honour the Top 40 — they are truly remarkable young women and men, who are experts in their fields and passionate about their work and communities. I also thank our program partners for their commitment. They understand that when we honour young leaders, it builds a sense of responsibility in them to be bold but thoughtful, and to contribute to our national economic and social vigour.”The Top 40 Under 40 recipients will be honoured at the Top 40 National Celebrations to be held in Toronto in November, including the Top 40 Awards Night Gala at the Metro Toronto Convention Centre on November 21st.last_img read more

Finance Committee to hold public hearing in Fort St John on June

first_imgVICTORIA, B.C. – The Select Standing Committee on Finance and Government Services has announced details for its Budget 2020 consultation.According to the Government, this consultation is an annual event where British Columbians are invited to share their priorities and ideas for the next Provincial Budget.Committee Chair, Bob D’Eith, says the consultation has been moved to June instead of the fall which will allow more time for the committee to put forward reviews and considerations. “Every year, the committee hears diverse perspectives and suggestions on a number of topics. Moving the consultation to June will allow for more time to review and consider this input and the recommendations put forward by the committee.”Residents can provide their input by speaking with the committee in-person or via teleconference at a public hearing. They can also send input via mail or through an online survey.A public hearing will be coming to Fort St. John on June 19, 2019.For more information, and to register, you can visit the committee’s website.last_img read more

Students from Peace Region bring home medals from Canada Wide Science Fair

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – Five students and two delegates travelled from the Peace Region to attend the Canada Wide Science Fair in Fredericton, New Brunswick.After successfully competing and winning their spots at the Regional Science Fair held in April, the group was amongst 409 other projects that were submitted to the Canada Wide Science Fair.Out of those 409 projects, three students from the North Peace were able to win medals for their science projects. Hollis Mattson, Grade 7 student at Devereaux Elementary, won a silver medal for her Underwater Soundscape project.Kyra Taylor, Grade 12 Student at North Peace Secondary School, received a bronze medal for her project ‘Keeping the Balance: The Correlation Between Diet and pH in the Equine Hindgut’.Emilia Dyksterhuis, Grade 7 Student, won a bronze medal for her project on ‘Spare Our Air: The Use of Algae Scrubbers in the Oil and Gas Industry’.Students received an all-expense trip thanks to the sponsorship of Shell, Encana, School District 60 Science Fair Foundation B.C., and Arc Resources.last_img read more

Rahul habitual liar people will punish Cong in LS polls Shivraj

first_imgNew Delhi: The BJP Monday accused Congress chief Rahul Gandhi of being a “habitual liar” and asked people not to fall in his “trap” in the Lok Sabha polls, a reference to his recent promises to the poor, including the minimum income scheme.BJP vice president and former Madhya Pradesh chief minister Shivraj Singh Chouhan claimed Congress governments in states like Madhya Pradesh have “cheated” farmers by not fulfilling their promise of waiving agriculture loans. Also Read – Uddhav bats for ‘Sena CM’There was no immediate response from the Congress to the BJP’s attack on its president. Chouhan told reporters Gandhi had claimed that the Congress will waive farmers’ loans within 10 days of coming to power in Madhya Pradesh but, he said, it had not been done even after 104 days of Kamal Nath taking over as chief minister. He played two video clips of Gandhi, first purportedly showing him making the promise and second in which he is heard saying that the state government has fulfilled it. Also Read – Farooq demands unconditional release of all detainees in J&K”Gandhi speaks lies with confidence and shamelessly. He is a habitual liar,” he claimed. Lakhs of farmers recently received a state government message telling them that the loan waiver exercise was put on hold due to the Model Code of Conduct that came into effect after the general election announcement, he claimed. It seems Kamal Nath had been waiting for the poll announcement so that he could get rid of this promise, he said taking a swipe at the state government.last_img read more

Tim Hinton hops aboard Urban Meyers staff at Ohio State

Ohio State football coach Urban Meyer didn’t have to wait long for an answer after asking Tim Hinton to serve as tight ends and fullbacks coach for the Buckeyes. “It was about 10 o’clock on a Friday (when Meyer) asked me to be part of the staff, and I can tell you by 10:01 I’d said yes,” Hinton said on Jan. 12 at an introductory press conference for the assistant coaching staff. Hinton, entering his 31st year of coaching and 17th at the collegiate level, joins the staff after coaching running backs at Notre Dame for the past two seasons. He and Meyer met and coached the Buckeyes together as graduate assistants in 1986, and Hinton received his master’s degree from OSU in 1987. Meyer said Hinton’s coaching resume within Ohio, which includes five state playoff berths in 11 years as coach of Harding High School in Marion, Ohio, as one of the primary reasons for his hiring. “(Hinton) and I worked together on the Ohio State staff in 1986, but what I am most impressed with is his time spent as a high school coach in Ohio,” Meyer said. “He had some outstanding teams at Harding and his extensive experiences coaching in the state were crucial in my desire to want him on our staff.” Hinton, who admits to being “a high school coach who coaches college football,” said the many relationships he has developed with Ohio high school coaches over the years can be helpful to OSU’s recruiting. “I’m one of those guys, so I’m kind of the alumni,” he said. “There are some great high school coaches in the state of Ohio and we’ve got to foster those relationships and continue to have great relationships with those coaches. “My wife (Bev), when she goes with me (to coaching clinics) says ‘Is there anyone that you don’t know?’ So I think that’s where it helps. There’s a personal connection and a personal relationship … I think having those great relationships with those coaches and knowing them on a personal basis, not just a professional basis, helps.” This will be the first time Hinton has coached tight ends since he served as the wide receivers and tight ends coach at Wilmington College from 1982-84. During the years of former OSU coach Jim Tressel, the tight end position was sometimes lost in the shuffle in the run-oriented “Tressel ball” offense. As Meyer brings his version of the spread offense to Ohio Stadium, it might seem that tight ends will continue to be overlooked, this time in lieu of multiple wide receivers and shifty running backs. Hinton said he isn’t buying that notion, and that the tight end position can have success in Meyer’s offense. New England Patriots tight end Aaron Hernandez is perhaps the best example of how a tight end can succeed in Meyer’s spread offense. Hernandez tallied 111 catches for 1,382 yards and 12 touchdowns under Meyer at Florida from 2007-09. Hinton said regardless of position, talented players will see the field and that the spread offense’s versatility offers a role for everyone. “The good players are always going to find an opportunity to get on the field,” Hinton said. “I’ve been in the spread offense for the last five years and you can utilize people in many different ways … there’s just a thousand ways to utilize your personnel and I think that’s one of the great things that the spread can bring you.” Read The Lantern on Tuesday for the next profile in the “Meyer’s New Men” coaching staff profile series. read more