Daily news from New Zealand – 9 October – Video

first_imgAustralia progress to the Semi-Finals after beating South Africa In today’s RWC Daily we have all the reaction and exctiement from the final two quarter-finals as Australia and New Zealand set up an enthralling semi-final at RWC 2011. Australian Wallabies captain James Horwill (C-L, blue helmet) reacts as referee Bryce Lawrence of New Zealand (upper C) blows the whistle during the 2011 Rugby World Cup quarter-final match South Africa vs Australia at the Wellington Regional stadium in Wellington on October 9, 2011. AFP PHOTO / Marty Melville (Photo credit should read Marty Melville/AFP/Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img

Andy Robinson needs to look to the future – Craig Chalmers

first_imgFind a newsagent that sells Rugby World in the UK. Or you may prefer the digital edition on your MAC, PC, or iPad. I think the Scottish public are still with Andy Robinson. He’s a very good coach. Our defence has been pretty solid and the forwards have competed against most teams – although we miss Euan Murray for the Sunday games, of which we have two this spring. We just need to improve our cutting edge.This article appeared in the January 2012 issue of Rugby World Magazine. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS ROVIGO, ITALY – JUNE 26: Duncan Weir of Scotland reacts during the IRB Junior World Championship 9th Place Play Off match between Scotland and Argentina at Mario Battaglini Stadium on June 26, 2011 in Rovigo, Italy. (Photo by Dino Panato/Getty Images) For Back Issues Contact John Denton Services at 01733-385-170 visit Duncan Weir – is he the future Scotland fly-half?There are some big decisions for Andy Robinson to make in the next few weeks, as he prepares for the RBS 6 Nations.Scotland’s World Cup has to be seen as a failure, so there must be some changes. There is no lack of effort, but our inability to score tries is a huge, huge problem. We only scored four at the World Cup, all against Romania. We must get some cutting edge, like Edinburgh have been showing. At stand-off I think it’s time to forget Dan Parks and I’m not 100% sure about Ruaridh Jackson. Harry Leonard at Edinburgh and Glasgow’s Duncan Weir are showing consistency and getting experience and the next step is to bring them into the national squad. They’re only 19 and 20 years of age, but a lot of good fly-halves come through at that age, although if you bring in a young guy you have to give them a run of games.The centres at the moment aren’t great distributors and we need to get our back three on the ball and playing. Injecting some young talent into the back-line is a way forward. Not three or four at a time, but a new player here and there would freshen things up and get more flair and cutting edge and invention into the team. There are several young guys playing well for Edinburgh, such as Matt Scott, James King and Lee Jones.There have been great expectations for Scotland to do well in the past couple of Six Nations and they haven’t come to fruition. I know Andy Robinson is as desperate as anyone to make it work. He should look at who is playing well for their club because we want players in the team that are full of confidence.If Andy wants to win games, will he be tempted to go with a conservative kicking game? Weir is a very good kicking stand-off and likes to have a bit of a run too. He has to improve his distribution and get the right mix of kicking and running with the ball, but he’s full of confidence and has a great temperament. I coached him at U20s level and he’s keen to learn and will listen. He’s ahead of Jackson.I like what I’ve seen of Leonard and Matt Scott as well. Scott was a ten but I felt his best position was 12 because kicking wasn’t a real strength of his. He has put some weight and size on and he’s a fine passer and can get a back-line moving really well. Tim Visser will qualify for Scotland next summer and he’s a real attacking threat, so to have him on the wing for Scotland would be a great asset.One player who won’t be involved in the Six Nations is lock Nathan Hines and he’ll be missed. The players looked up to him – and not just because he’s tall! He has a lot of knowledge and the guys at Leinster say he was a really big influence when he was there and they’re still missing him. Would you like to sign up to Rugby World’s excellent weekly email newsletter? Click here.last_img read more

England turn to youth for dead rubber

first_img In what could be his final game in charge Stuart Lancaster has rung the changes in his England team, naming a new-look backline to take on Uruguay.The dead rubber in Manchester should be a sombre affair, as England try to come to terms with their elimination from the tournament, but Lancaster has unsurprisingly freshened things up.While Chris Robshaw continues as skipper, there are eight personnel changes and a further positional change from the England team that was beaten by Australia on Saturday.Danny Care and George Ford will form a new-look half-back pairing, with Owen Farrell shifting out to inside centre.He will link up with Henry Slade, who finally gets his first taste of the tournament, as does fellow Exeter Chief Jack Nowell, who replaces the injured Jonny May.First game for Henry Slade at the tournament. Photo: Getty Images.Alex Goode is preferred to Mike Brown at full-back, with Anthony Watson the only back to start in the same position he did against the Wallabies.Up front Mako Vunipola replaces the much-maligned Joe Marler at loosehead, while the other two changes come in the back row. A completely new backline will have to create a spark as England aim to finish a miserable tournament on a positive note LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS James Haskell starts in place of Tom Wood at blindside flanker, while Nick Easter starts what will almost certainly be his final Test at number eight.Nick Easter gets his chance at number eight. Photo: Getty Images.There are a couple of new faces on the bench with the inclusion of Jamie George and David Wilson, but there is no place in the 23 for Sam Burgess.While it’s difficult to read too much into what is essentially a meaningless game against arguably the weakest team in the tournament, Lancaster has at least picked a more expansive backline.The issues in the back row remain, but given the personnel available to him, there was nothing that could be done about that.And the fact that England won’t be facing David Pocock and Michael Hooper will also help in that regard. Lancaster might not be the man to take England forward, but this team could be a starting point for what the team may look like when the Six Nations rolls around.England: Alex Goode, Anthony Watson, Henry Slade, Owen Farrell, Jack Nowell, George Ford, Danny Care, Mako Vunipola, Tom Youngs, Dan Cole, Joe Launchbury, Geoff Parling, James Haskell, Chris Robshaw (c), Nick EasterReplacements: Jamie George, Joe Marker, David Wilson, George Kruis, Tom Wood, Richard Wigglesworth, Jonathan Joseph, Mike Brownlast_img read more

Commonwealth Games rugby sevens preview by Ben Ryan

first_img Scrapping Premiership relegation would have positive effect argues Ben Ryan LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS There’s no doubt about it, they will play some scintillating sevens on the Gold Coast, which hosted a leg of the series until it was replaced by Sydney. Fiji won the last one there – another clue that come finals day it will be the bright blue Fijian flag hoisted the highest.This article appears in the May 2018 edition of Rugby World magazine. Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Commonwealth Games rugby sevens preview by Ben RyanPrior to the 2010 Commonwealth Games, I hadn’t ever coached a team as machine gunners and snipers manned the clubhouse roof to cover each corner of the pitch, but I ticked that box in Delhi. It was a surreal experience, from being in the bowels of the stadium for hours in ridiculous heat waiting to march out at the opening ceremony, to the cheering local crowds, their excitement peaking when the ball was kicked to touch.It was incredibly hot during the tournament, too. The run of the England team I was coaching ended in the semi-finals as we lost to a New Zealand team that included All Blacks Ben Smith, Hosea Gear and Liam Messam.Bernard Foley, Nick Cummins, Nick Phipps, Luke Morahan and Lachie Turner would all become Test stars, having played in the Australian team we beat in the group stages but that went on to win a silver medal.Defending champs: South Africa took gold at the 2014 Games in Glasgow (Getty Images)In the tournament this month on the Gold Coast, Australia wouldn’t have that second chance as it’s only the group winners that progress to the semi-finals. It lessens the tournament in my opinion and it’s a weird decision, considering the women’s event has only eight teams and the top two sides in each group go through to the last four.England have a particularly difficult group with both Australia, currently fourth in the World Series standings, and Samoa, the team that knocked them out in the 2014 Commonwealth Games in Glasgow. It’s a tough ask and on current form they will not progress, but they have the players to medal and many have both Olympic and Commonwealth experience, which will make a huge difference.Multi-sport events like this do come with a tonne of distractions and undoubtedly some teams will fall as a result. I have seen teams overeating in the 24/7 food halls or distracted by being in the presence of so many different athletes and nations.The biggest threat in Fiji’s group is Wales, but you would expect the Olympic champions to go deep into this tournament – their first Commonwealth Games since 2006 and their expulsion due to the coup later that year. The debate surrounding Aviva Premiership relegation goes on,… Collapse Opinion: Ben Ryan on the Premiership’s injury crisis Expand MORE COLUMNS FROM BEN RYAN Scrapping Premiership relegation would have positive effect argues Ben Ryan Ben Ryan guided Fiji to gold at the Rio Olympics and here he casts his eye over the contenders for the Commonwealth Games medals on the Gold Coast South Africa have another home nation, Scotland, in their group but you would fancy the winners of the 2014 Games to medal. Finally, let’s look at New Zealand – the most successful nation in rugby sevens. Here, an upset is possible. Canada and Kenya are in Pool C alongside New Zealand and both have the potential to beat them.It’s going to be a cracker of a tournament but a cut-throat one too. Uganda, Jamaica, Papua New Guinea, Zambia, Sri Lanka and Malaysia will all be there, and whilst Uganda will show some flashes of brilliance, don’t expect any acts of giant killing – the gap between these teams and the top ten is just too much right now.Bright sparks: The Australia women’s squad arrive at Gold Coast Airport (Getty Images)The women also make their Commonwealth Games bow and it’s so good that they are alongside the men, after the amazing tournament all the teams had in Rio for the 2016 Olympics.Again, Australia, New Zealand and Canada will be fancied to take the podium, but England, although they have had a poor couple of seasons, do have the resources and players to upset that celebrated triumvirate.My prediction for the men’s event? It’s Fiji for me. They have never won gold in the Commonwealth Games and with their recent World Series win in Vancouver, they have shown their form has returned and their stars are shining. Jump to it: Fiji’s Amenoni Nasilasila in action during their Hong Kong Sevens win (Getty Images) Opinion: Ben Ryan on the Premiership’s injury crisis Fiji’s Olympic gold medal-winning coach Ben Ryan gives…last_img read more

Rugby World Cup Referee Announced For Final

first_img Playing on: Jerome Garces gestures during the quarter-final (Getty Images) Rugby World Cup Referee Announced For FinalJerome Garces will referee the 2019 Rugby World Cup final between England and South Africa on Saturday 2 November in Yokohama.Garces is the first Frenchman to take charge of a World Cup final and he will be assisted by Romain Poite (France) and Ben O’Keeffe (New Zealand). Ben Skeen (New Zealand) is the TMO for the match.Garces said: “I am honoured and delighted to be appointed to referee the Rugby World Cup 2019 final. It is a dream as a referee, but this is a team sport, and as a team of four, we will be out there to do the best for the teams, the fans, the sport, but also the entire match officials team, selectors and support team, who have worked so hard over the last four years.”Related: Downtime with Jerome GarcesWayne Barnes has the whistle for the third-place play-off between New Zealand and Wales on Friday night in Tokyo. It will be his 90th Test as a referee and his 21st at a World Cup.His assistants are Jaco Peyper (South Africa) and Pascal Gaüzère (France), with Marius Jonker (South Africa) as TMO.Final: England v South Africa – Jerome Garces (France) Bronze Final: New Zealand v Wales – Wayne Barnes (England)Related: Who has the most red cards at the Rugby World Cup?Rugby World Cup RefereesReferees (12): Wayne Barnes (England), Luke Pearce (England), Jérôme Garcès (France), Romain Poite (France), Pascal Gaüzère (France), Mathieu Raynal (France), Nigel Owens (Wales), Jaco Peyper (South Africa), Ben O’Keeffe (New Zealand), Paul Williams (New Zealand), Nic Berry (Australia) and Angus Gardner (Australia)Assistant referees (seven): Matthew Carley (England, reserve referee), Karl Dickson (England), Andrew Brace (Ireland), Brendon Pickerill (New Zealand), Federico Anselmi (Argentina), Shuhei Kubo (Japan) and Alex Ruiz (France)TMOs (four): Graham Hughes (England), Rowan Kitt (England), Ben Skeen (New Zealand) and Marius Jonker (South Africa)Follow our Rugby World Cup homepage which we update regularly with news and features. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Find out the referee, assistants and TMO selected for the 2019 Rugby World Cup final between England and South Africa Also make sure you know about the Groups, Dates, Fixtures, Venues, TV Coverage, Qualified Teams by clicking on the highlighted links.Finally, don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.last_img read more

Lent and the MDGs

first_img Submit a Press Release Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK By Christopher EptingPosted Feb 27, 2012 Rector Shreveport, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Comments (3) The Rev Netha N Brada says: Lent and the MDGs Rector Bath, NC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York February 28, 2012 at 4:43 pm Thanks for putting the MDGs into a document that makes them clear and completely relevant! It was so nice to have them in the same place with a statement of our focus for ministry in the Episcopal Church. Featured Jobs & Calls Featured Events Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Press Release Service Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Bishop Christopher Epting[Episcopal News Service] Our presiding bishop suggested this year that we might use the United Nations’ Millennium Development Goals as a lens through which to view our observance of this season. When the Episcopal Church adopted these goals at our 2006 General Convention, there was some criticism that these were “secular” goals and that we were somehow taking our eyes off the real mission of the church by using these as guidelines or milestones on our spiritual journey as Episcopalians.Well, let’s see – eradicating poverty and hunger…achieving universal primary education…promoting gender equality and empowering women … reducing child mortality … improving maternal health … combating HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases … ensuring environmental sustainability … and developing a global partnership for development.Those sound suspiciously close to Gospel values, if you ask me, particularly when you take into consideration the fact that Jesus’ primary message in the Gospels was not about how individuals could go to heaven, but about establishing the Kingdom of God here on earth! In Mark’s brief account of Jesus’ temptations in the wilderness which we read today on this First Sunday of Lent, he did not spend a lot of time on the specifics of those temptations, but concludes the story by summarizing the essence of Jesus’ message (which was essentially the same as John the Baptist before him and the Hebrew prophets down through the ages):“Jesus came to Galilee, proclaiming the good news of God and saying, ‘The time is fulfilled, and the kingdom of God has come near, repent, and believe in that good news!’” (Mark1:15). The good news, for Jesus, was that God was king and Caesar was not! The good news for Jesus was that it was not necessary to wait around for some distant future when God’s reign and God’s sovereignty would be established. That time had come! And it was time to turn around, acknowledge that fact, and begin to live as though it was true! The time is fulfilled…the kingdom of God has come near…repent…and believe that good news!And how are we to live, now that the Kingdom has dawned in the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus? Well, we are to work to eradicate poverty and hunger – because Jesus once saw to it that 5,000 people were fed because (he said), “I have compassion for the crowd.” (Mark 8:2)We are to commit to make universal primary education available to the children of the world – because Jesus once said “Let the little children come to me; do not stop them; for it is to such as these that the kingdom of God (really) belongs.” (Mark 10:14)We are to empower women – because Jesus did! The way he treated women (radical in his day!), the fact that they were among his closest followers, the fact that they were the primary witnesses to the Resurrection all speak to the appropriateness of that endeavor for Christians and for the Christian Church!We are to work to reduce child mortality — because Jesus was once confronted with a young boy with a terrible, debilitating illness. “How long has this been happening to him,” he asked the father. “From childhood,” the man answered, “It has often cast him into the fire and water, to destroy him; but if you are able to do anything, have pity on us and help us.” Mark says “the boy was like a corpse, so that most of them said, ‘He is dead’ but Jesus took him by the hand and lifted him up, and he was able to stand,” (Mark 9: 21 passim)We are to improve maternal health – because Jesus once healed a woman who had been hemorrhaging for twelve years (perhaps since the day of her first-born’s delivery). “If I but touch his clothes,” she said, I will be made well. Immediately her hemorrhage stopped; and she felt in her body that she was healed of her disease.” (Mark 5:28-29)We are to commit to combating HIV/AIDS, malaria, and other diseases because if there is one thing that is absolutely clear from the Gospel accounts of Jesus’ life, it is that he was a healer! He never turned away anyone who sought healing. And he never asked how they got sick!We are to ensure environmental sustainability because Jesus came from farming country in northern Palestine. He loved the land, using the cycles of planting and harvesting in so many of his parables. And he came to love the sea – making sure his fishermen friends always hauled in a great catch (even after they had left their nets…to follow him). (Mark1:16)And, finally, we are to support efforts to partner with our sister and brother Christians, and all people of good will around the world, because it was said, of Jesus, that he made no distinctions among people and once, when a stranger was found casting out demons in his name, Jesus said, “Do not stop him; for no one who does a deed of power in my name will be able soon afterward to speak evil of me. Whoever is not against us is for us.” (Mark 9:39-40)Yes, I think the Millennium Development Goals, perhaps first articulated by the United Nations, meet the scriptural test as being faithful to the Gospel message. And the fact that some people find that so hard to believe is more a testimony of our failure to preach the message Jesus sent us out to preach than it does to their ignorance or hardness of heart. For too often, dear friends, our message has been too timid and our God too small for people even to “believe this good news” let alone to “repent.”During these forty days of penitence and fasting, I challenge you to do a bit more than giving up chocolate. I know you’re doing some of these things at your churches and in your individual lives, but I challenge you to continue to dream big dreams and to take on at least one of these goals this Lent – either locally or somewhere around the world.Because … the time is fulfilled … the kingdom of God has come near … Repent, and believe in this good news!— The Rt. Rev. Christopher Epting is assistant bishop of the Diocese of Chicago. The Very Rev. Dr. Joyce Beaulieu says: Rector Martinsville, VA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Albany, NY Peg Williams says: Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Youth Minister Lorton, VA Tags Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC center_img Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Tampa, FL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Lent February 28, 2012 at 9:40 am I appreciate very much your connecting us to the “secular” problems of the world! I work with health system issues, which I also consider our mission as Christians. Regardless of your secular political leaning, Christians are called to all the serve all those challenged by poverty and all the systems that degrade our humanity. Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Job Listing Rector Belleville, IL An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Collierville, TN In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit an Event Listing Rector Washington, DC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Knoxville, TN Curate Diocese of Nebraska Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA February 27, 2012 at 5:20 pm I had not read more than about half of your article, when it became necessary to quickly find the Kleenex box. Jesus’ message is so clear – why do we find it so hard to understand?? The need for the MDGs is in front of us every time we leave our comfortable homes – and churches. It reminds me of a dismissal that the late Bishop Paul Moore often used – “Get up from your pew – Get out the door – Get lost in the world!” Thank you for reminding us, Bishop Epting! TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Rector Columbus, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Comments are closed. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Cathedral Dean Boise, IDlast_img read more

‘Messy’ process is working, budget committee leaders say

first_img‘Messy’ process is working, budget committee leaders say PBF decides to keep diocesan asking at current level Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ [Episcopal News Service – Indianapolis] The process of developing a budget for the Episcopal Church’s 2013-2015 triennium has been typically messy, but it is working, according to the chair and vice chair of the Joint Standing Committee on Program, Budget and Finance (PBF).“I don’t think it has not been a failure; I just think it’s been messy,” said New York Deputy and PB&F Chair Diane Pollard, who added that “sometimes you have to go through mess to get to the other side.”Diocese of Maine Bishop Steve Lane, who is PBF’s vice chair, agreed.“Doing it this way as a matter of policy, which is what it is, means that every time [we do it] we have this mess,” he said. “I think people are looking for a more orderly, more on-going, more long-term process.”That desire, Lane said, was the motivation behind a move July 6 on the part of some members of the House of Bishops to vote “no” on resolutions that they said bogged down convention or put the funding cart before the budget horse.Convention considers resolutions that include requests for money from the future budget at the same time PBF is crafting the budget that has to include them. When a resolution with funding implications is approved by both bishops and deputies, it goes to the budget committee which must decide how and, in some cases, if to account for the request in the budget.“I believe that the votes in the House of Bishops yesterday were a protest against the manner in which the Episcopal Church does budgeting,” Lane said. “The complaint is about the parallel process between the work of Program, Budget and Finance on the one hand, and the work of all the rest of the committees presenting resolutions to be funded. They go along side by side, and they only meet in the budget proposal, which leaves everyone dissatisfied.”PBF has made some decisions already, including choosing to base the primary portion of the budget’s income on the current 19 percent asking from the church’s 109 dioceses and three regional mission areas.Lane said the committee heard “strong support” during an income hearing (video here) on July 6 for leaving the asking at the 19 percent level. “And we heard two folks talking about their [diocesan] efforts to do more and do better [than that percentage] and urging the rest of the church to do likewise,” he said.Each year’s annual giving in the three-year budget is currently based on a diocese’s income two years earlier, minus $120,000. General Convention’s 2010-2012 budget was based on a 21 percent asking in 2010, 20 percent in 2011 and 19 percent in 2012.The committee is scheduled to present its proposed budget July 10 at 2:15 p.m. to a joint session of the House of Bishops and the House of Deputies in the deputies’ hall. Lane has said that because the budget document must be to the printer by 3 p.m. local time July 9 at the latest, the committee will have its 2013-2015 proposed budget finished by noon that day.A vote in each house is set for July 12, the last day of convention. The budget takes effect Jan. 1, 2013.Both Pollard and Lane said budgeting planning needs to start earlier than the current process allow. “Many of the conversations we’re having today should have happened 18 months ago,” Lane said, as Pollard nodded in agreement.“One of the immense problems with our way of doing budgets is the limited time which people have to absorb the information and then make conscious and deliberate decisions about priorities,” he said. “Doing it in five days is impossible for everybody.”A large portion of PB&F’s struggles could be helped by a “strong budget committee” which included members of the Executive Council that would operate throughout the triennium, Pollard said.However, she cautioned, the process of developing a budget to fund the Episcopal Church’s mission and ministry “can’t be perfectly orderly, because if it’s perfectly orderly then people are not having the opportunity to talk.” Thus, she said, “you have to expect some mess in it, but it could have been a little more orderly.”The traditional mess, they both said, was exacerbated this year the multiple errors in the proposed draft budget that the church’s Executive Council gave to PB&F in January (as is required by church canon (in Canon I.4.6) and the General Convention’s Joint Rules (in II.10 10 (a)).Because council was not allowed to change anything in the budget once it had been given to PBF, the members issued a memo from it April meeting, saying that the version of the proposed draft budget released to the church “is not exactly” the one it passed.Then on June 1 Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, Chief Operating Officer Bishop Stacy Sauls and Treasurer to General Convention Kurt Barnes released an annotated version of council’s budget.And, three weeks later, Jefferts Schori proposed an alternative budget that she said was “more clearly based on missional strategy” than the council’s budget.Add to that a plethora of criticism and suggestions in the blogosphere and on various listservs and both Pollard and Lane said PBF wound up with more information than is often the case.The committee decided July 4 to use the template of the presiding bishop’s budget, which is based on the Anglican Communion’s Five Marks of Mission. It has “taken the best work of Executive Council,” in Lane’s words, into that template along with other information.This evening (July 7) from 7:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. PBF will hold a hearing on expenses in the 2013-2015 budget in Indianapolis Marriott Downtown.“The work of PBF is not complete,” Lane said. “We urge people to attend, we urge people to raise their concerns and hopes for our consideration.”— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Press Release Service Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Featured Events Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Belleville, IL Comments are closed. Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Washington, DC Submit an Event Listing Featured Jobs & Calls New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Harry Stevens says: TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Bath, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC center_img Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit a Press Release Program Budget & Finance General Convention, Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK General Convention 2012, The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Martinsville, VA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Tags July 8, 2012 at 12:10 pm The problem as I see it is all these resolutions pass with no offset to show where the money will come from. If there is a specific amount of money expected to come in and the committee is trying to balance a budget they someone adds to the costs they are left to come up with where to cut. It should be that for all proposals not in the budget they have to come up with what will be cut or raised for passage. Money should be left at the local level to do what only the people there know are the most pressing needs. There are way too many struggling parishes to keep expecting them to up the amount passed up the ladder. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Pittsburgh, PA Comments (1) Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit a Job Listing Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Albany, NY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Jul 7, 2012 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Tampa, FLlast_img read more

Presiding Bishop writes to presidential candidates

first_img Cathedral Dean Boise, ID martha knight says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Allison Duvall says: Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET MJ Fowler says: Bishop Allen Bartlett says: Advocacy Peace & Justice, Fr Steven Smith says: Anne Lynn says: AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis October 19, 2012 at 9:10 am Is speaking the truth of the “facts on the ground” that is, the slow, steady elimination of the presence of Palestinians on any part of Israel-Palestine, and/or the “wharehousing ” of the Palestinian people just “criticism of Israeli behavior” or the truth as we are seeing it? Ed McCarthy says: October 13, 2012 at 8:17 pm Powerfully written, Bp. Katharine. Many thanks. May all make peace come to pass, for all of God’s children in the Middle East. Rector Shreveport, LA Presiding Bishop writes to presidential candidates October 12, 2012 at 5:46 pm We continue to ceaselssly pray and work towards Peace and goodwill among the Three collegial Abrahamic Faiths, and especially in the Holy City of Jerusalem. Rector Tampa, FL Israel-Palestine, Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Rev. Harriet B. Linville says: Charles Robideau says: Rev. Rex McKee says: Marianne Albina says: Comments (26) Featured Events Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET October 23, 2012 at 5:51 pm F. William Thewalt says:“I fail to see why the Episcopal church supports and/or favors the Palestinians against the Israelis. Palestine and it allies stand for the elimination of Israel.”Your comment repeats a widely disseminated but wholly baseless assertion.(1) Actually, Hamas (commonly identified as an enemy seeking to “eliminate” Israel) was in large part Israel’s creation as a means of dividing the Palestinian independence movement::“Instead of trying to curb Gaza’s Islamists from the outset, says Mr. Cohen, Israel for years tolerated and, in some cases, encouraged them as a counterweight to the secular nationalists of the Palestine Liberation Organization and its dominant faction, Yasser Arafat’s Fatah. Israel cooperated with a crippled, half-blind cleric named Sheikh Ahmed Yassin, even as he was laying the foundations for what would become Hamas.”The Wall Street Journal: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB123275572295011847.html(2) Iranian President Ahmadinejad, though he is almost always blamed for threatening to wipe Israel off the map, has never threatened Israel’s existence. This inaccurate account of his remark has fed the image of Israel as victim and has therefore been exploited consistently by Israeli officials. The statement at issue was not his statement; nor was it a threat against Israel. It was uttered by Ayatollah Khomeini. Ahmadinejad’s words were (in correct translation): “The Imam [Ayatollah Khomeini] said this regime, occupying Jerusalem, must vanish from the page of time.” 1. This is what Khomeini said. He had said it years earlier, and at that time no one took it seriously. 2. He said “this regime,” not “Jews,” and not “Israel.” 3. He did not say “must be destroyed,” rather “must [is destined to] disappear.” What he meant was that Israel’s regime and political system “must” disappear, akin to what happened in the Soviet Union, where the regime disappeared without bloodshed. In fact, Khomeini, in a famous letter to Gorbachev, had made that prediction.http://www.richardsilverstein.com/2010/12/14/well-wipe-israel-off-the-map-and-other-things-ahmadinejad-never-said/(3) Much of the Palestinian struggle to end their country’s illegal occupation by Israel has been nonviolent. Some Palestinian leaders (or Arab leaders from other nations) employing nonviolent methods, teaching their use, and mobilizing their compatriots to employ them include: Daoud Nassar, Father Raed Awad, Faysal El-Husseini (called “the Palestinian Gandhi”), Jawdat Said, Jonathan Kuttab (co-founder of the Palestinian Center for the Study of Nonviolence), Sami Al Jundi (supervisor of the Seeds of Peace Center, Jerusalem), Yahya Shurbaji and Ghiyath Matar (Syrian peace advocates), Abdallah Abu Rahmah (a school teacher and coordinator of the nonviolent Bil’in Popular Committee Against the Wall), and Mubarak Awad (psychologist, founder of the Palestinian Center for the Study of Nonviolence), whom Prime Minister Yitzak Shamir deported from Israel in April 1988 over the objections of President Ronald Reagan and Secretary of State George Schultz. (The Prime Minister was so far from respecting the Palestinian peace movement — or any Palestinians — that he commonly referred to the latter as “cockroaches” [In the Footsteps of Gandhi, p. 51]). I could continue this list, but probably this number will suffice. Information concerning all of these Palestinian peace advocates is available on the web. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Press Release Press Release Service Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Knoxville, TN Tags Rector Smithfield, NC Submit a Job Listing Rector Belleville, IL October 22, 2012 at 11:07 pm Well said my friend. If the Presiding Bishop is wrong on the subject of human sexuality, biblical inerrancy, the divine nature of Jesus Christ, and centuries of apostolic teaching, then surely she’s wrong on middle east policy. Have a blessed day and keep the faithful in South Carolina in your prayers as God leads us to greener (and more orthodox) pastures. October 12, 2012 at 5:07 pm Thank you, Bishop Jefferts Schori. Amen. October 15, 2012 at 12:09 pm I appreciate this strong statement and hope that she( along with other religious Leaders in the US) will put strong pressure on both Congress and the Administration -to lead this Peace initiative. WAR is nonzero-sum game.. peace is peace and war is war: if anybody “loses,” everybody else does, too.If Palestine is to be free and independent, Israel must be safe; if Israelis are to be free from young men with bombs, Palestinians must be safe from Israeli helicopters and bulldozers. F. William Thewalt says: October 12, 2012 at 9:42 pm It is nice that ethe PB has written to the cadidates for President. It would have been nice if she had joined the 15 religious leadwers who wrote to congress to enforce our laws on foreign aid to Israel. see: LOUISVILLEFifteen religious leaders representing many major faith groups in the country, have written a letter to Congress seeking to make U.S. military aid to Israel contingent upon its government’s “compliance with applicable U.S. laws and policies Jim Tate October 12, 2012 at 4:39 pm I pray that ears and hearts be open to the truth of our bishop’s fine letter. The Rev. Sharline A. Fulton says: Posted Oct 12, 2012 October 18, 2012 at 9:57 am The letter is a good one. However, the theme that only direct negotiations can resolve the issue denies the reality that the Israelis are all powerful and the Palestinians are virtually powerless. It is difficult to imagine how talks only between the two peoples can accomplish any reasonable settlement of the issue of Palestinian freedom and self-determination.The letter also gives no recognition, explicitly or implicitly, that the Palestinians are the ones having their land stolen, their resources such as water, being taken away from them, and their heritage and history being dispossessed. Even the word “anti-semitism”, as used to defend Jews, is a high-jacking of Palestinian identity as the Palestinians are a truly Semitic people. Whether we want to admit it or not, it is the Israeli people who are doing the stealing and dispossessing.When one people, such as the Palestinians, are being controlled by another people for their own selfish ends, such as what is going on in Palestine, it seems to me that it is the same dynamic as an issue such as slavery. The institution of slavery did not end by slaves and slaveholders negotiating a settlement or the freedom of slaves. It ended because the outside world spoke out and supported the movement to end the practice. People such as William Wilberforce would be an example of leaders who took up the challenge. My own feelings about Christianity, and my own Church specifically, is that we need to take up the challenge of speaking out in support of Palestinian freedom and equality.To admonish the Palestinians for what a few among them may do wrong in reaction to their dispossession, without paying a much greater priority to addressing the core issue, Palestinian dispossession, is not right. They are an “equal” people, in the eyes of God, as are all people, and need to be recognized in that light. Rev. Robert T. Yeager says: Jeffrey Susman says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 October 25, 2012 at 1:24 pm The letter rides roughshod over the reality of an overwhelming power imbalance between an occupying military superpower and a minimally armed subject population. Rector Collierville, TN The Rev’d Canon Samir J. Habiby says: Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector Columbus, GA David Burwell- Johnson says: center_img Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Bath, NC October 12, 2012 at 8:48 pm Thank you, Bishop Jefferts Schori. It is my hope and prayer that our leadership will have the courage and conviction to match words with deeds. Our government has stated on many occasions its opposition to continued West Bank expansion by illegal Israeli settlements, but it has never taken any action to stop it. We have conditioned our aid to other countries upon their compliance with basic human rights norms. I hope that the President will condition any continued aid to Israel upon their compliance with international law, and put a halt to settlement expansion. Otherwise we are complicit in the crime, and are seen as hypocrites in the eyes of the world. Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 [Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs] Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori has written to the presidential candidates, urging President Barack Obama and the Hon. Mitt Romney “to use the debate forum to articulate strong support for a just and peaceful resolution to the Arab-Israeli-Palestinian conflict, as well as a clear plan for how you would work to support that goal in the next four years.”The following is the text of the letter:October 12, 2012The Hon. Barack Obama                   The Hon. Mitt Romneyc/o Obama for America                     c/o Romney for PresidentP.O. Box 803638                                 PO Box 149756Chicago, IL  60686                             Boston, MA  02114-9756Dear Mr. President and Governor Romney,As each of you prepares for the two remaining presidential debates, I write to urge you to use the debate forum to articulate strong support for a just and peaceful resolution to the Arab-Israeli-Palestinian conflict, as well as a clear plan for how you would work to support that goal in the next four years.While the volatile political nature across the Middle East has emerged as a key theme in this year’s campaign, I am concerned by the relative absence of discussion of a conflict that is central to that region’s future.  This week Palestinian leaders have signaled their willingness to consider a return to the negotiating table, and it will be vital for the next President to prioritize the re-launch of the peace process and to articulate a clear vision for how American diplomatic leadership can assist and encourage negotiations.Support for a two-state solution is the shared policy of the United States government, the government of Israel, and the Palestinian National Authority.  The contours of such a solution should be clear to all:  a secure and universally recognized Israel, the homeland for the Jewish people, standing alongside a viable, contiguous, and independent Palestinian state with a shared Jerusalem as the capital for each state.  Despite widespread recognition that a solution should reflect this goal, progress toward it has remained elusive.In the meantime, the level of strife in the conflict has grown.  Several current trends give significant cause for alarm, including the threat to Israel’s security from others in the region, most especially a nuclear Iran; continued Israeli settlement building, particularly in and around Jerusalem, at a pace and pattern that complicates the territorial contiguity of a future Palestinian state; unacceptable levels of violence on all sides; and the humanitarian disaster of the Gaza Strip.  Each of these complicates the task of peace negotiations, and each passing day makes a final solution more difficult to achieve.While it remains fundamentally true that only direct bilateral negotiation between Israelis and Palestinians themselves can bring about a just and lasting peace, history is clear that American political leadership has the power to play a catalytic role in supporting the work of peacemakers.   As you present your foreign-policy plans to the American people, I urge you to discuss specifically how you would work with our nation’s partners in the Quartet for Middle East Peace to support the resumption and successful completion of negotiations.  I urge you to be as specific as possible, considering not just the complexities of the issues to be resolved by the parties, but also the impact of such factors as the upcoming Israeli elections, Palestinian political division, rising unrest and extremism in the region, and the tragic humanitarian dimensions of the conflict.As Presiding Bishop of The Episcopal Church, I lead a faith community with a particular concern for peaceful resolution of this long and devastating conflict.  Our Church’s partner in the region, the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem, has stood for decades as a voice of peace and moderation – and a significant provider of healthcare, education, and social services – in the midst of the various instabilities of the region.  The Diocese of Jerusalem, together with its Episcopal and Anglican partners in the United States and throughout the world, works to build understanding and reconciliation through these forms of human service – in Israel and the Palestinian territories, as well as Jordan, Lebanon, and Syria.  The Anglican Bishop in Jerusalem, the Rt. Rev. Suheil Dawani, has described the role of Christians in the Holy Land as to “work together with people of other faiths to encourage the politicians to put politics aside and meet midway, where all people are equal.”I believe that the next American President has an opportunity and a responsibility to help make this vision of reconciliation a reality.  The peace and stability of the region, the safety and human dignity of those who live in the midst of this conflict, and the moral character of our own nation all require the full engagement of the United States and its President in the resolution of the conflict.  Would that we were again known as builders of peace on the global stage!Please know that my prayers are with each of you, and with our nation, in these undoubtedly challenging and personally costly final days of the campaign.  I remainYour servant in ChristThe Most Rev. Katharine Jefferts SchoriPresiding BishopThe Episcopal Church Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Comments are closed. Youth Minister Lorton, VA October 19, 2012 at 4:26 pm Bishop Katharine, Your letter runs off the road at the third paragraph, where you state: “Support for a two-state solution is the shared policy of the United States government, the government of Israel, and the Palestinian National Authority.” If the government of Israel wanted two states, it would not have done everything it could to prevent that solution. It wouldn’t have encouraged rampant expansion of settlements on Palestinian land, or imposed harsh — even brutal — restrictions on the rights of the Palestinian people. It wouldn’t have built the wall, an affront to basic humanity. If our U.S. government really wanted a two-state solution, it would not have winked at Israel’s abuse of the Palestinian people. It would not have shielded Israel from any censure by the United Nations, or rewarded Israel with financial aid and weaponry that help support Israel’s occupation of Palestinian territory. If either of the presidential candidates you address had an open mind on the issue, they would not be trying to outdo each other in obeisance to their “good friend” Bibi Netanyahu and the supposed Jewish vote. Most important, if our Episcopal Church were committed to a Palestinian settlement worthy of the Abrahamic faith we profess, we would not abet the literalization and trivialization of that faith by the claim of many — but surely not all — Israelis that God gave that tiny piece of Holy Land to one single group of people, out of all the God-created peoples on God’s earth. In you letter, you appropriately hold up the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem and its leader, Bishop Suheil Dawani, as exemplars of faithful efforts to preserve Christianity in the land of Jesus. It might be noted as well, however, that Bishop Dawani and his Lutheran colleague, Bishop Munib Younan, are among 13 patriarchs and heads of Christian denominations in Jerusalem who have endorsed the Kairos Palestine statement of 2009, a passionate cry for peace, but even more for justice, in the Holy Land. The call of the 2009 statement has now been amplified by a new Kairos USA statement, endorsed by communicants of many Christian denominations, including our own. If you could add your endorsement to that statement, it would be salutary James Tate says: Middle East, Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Thomas Worthm says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME October 12, 2012 at 10:46 pm Well Said Tim….I think of our confessionWe have denied your goodness in each other,in ourselves, and in the world you have created.We repent of the evil that enslaves us,the evil we have done,and the evil done on our behalf.I grow weary confessing the evil done on my behalf…. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Washington, DC October 12, 2012 at 9:18 pm I fail to see why the Episcopal church supports and/or favors the Palestinians against the Israelis. Palestine and it allies stand for the elimination of Israel. The organizations in control of Palestine stand for and participate in terrorism in Israel, the U.S. and around the world. Israel has made contributions the world and world peace by at least a factor of 10 over that of the Palestinians.F. W. Thewalt Episcopal Office of Public Affairs, Danny Buckley says: October 12, 2012 at 9:18 pm Selah! Don Reed says: Addison Bross says: October 22, 2012 at 3:48 pm If the bishop is so concerned about real justice and peace, why has she not signed the letter from her ecumenical partners to Congress calling for an accounting of U.S. aid to Israel. Really bishop… step up, and make Jesus proud! October 18, 2012 at 1:13 pm An Open Letter to Bishop Jefferts SchoriI commend you for not going along with other Protestant denominations in calling for a withdrawal of military aid to Israel. The effort by Lutherans and Methodists to influence American foreign policy toward Israel will only serve to create a gulf between those denominations and Jews.Jews have long been socially discriminated against by various Christian denominations, and the efforts by Lutherans and Methodists will simply be interpreted by the majority of Jews as another example of targetted discrimination, especially when no other groups (e.g. Russians, Syrians, etc.) are rarely, if ever, condemned for acts against humanity.One shouldn’t forget that Luther himself was violently anti-Semitic, and his book against Judaism was required reading in Nazi Germany.The ever shrinking number of mainline Protestants in America should give pause to those taking on Quixotic quests which will only serve to alienate those who are their religious siblings.The Catholic church has attempted to make amends for 2,000 years of anti-Semitic teachings. Would that Protestants could do the same thing. Indeed, where were the mainline churches during the Holocaust? Playing golf in restricted clubs?I recall that a few years ago, the Episcopal Church and other Protestants condemned the wall erected by Israel to deter terrorist bombs. Rather than condemning acts of terrorism, the church condemned the wall that prevented terrorism. The wall remains, and suicide bombings have disappeared. Now, the Americans have sent 1,000 U.S. soldiers to Israel to participate in joint military maneuvers. The call by mainline Protestants to end such participation will fall on deaf ears in the Pentagon as did the call to dismantle the anti-terrorist wall.It was an act of individual courage by you Bishop Shori not to participate in a message that is historically callous, sentimentally shallow, and naively Quixotic.Faithfully,Jeffrey Sussman Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori Neil Richardon says: Submit an Event Listing TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Sheila Pyle says: October 18, 2012 at 12:28 pm How can ANYONE disagree with the fair and free sharing of Palestine among peoples who declare their love and allegience to their part of the world? Neither God nor Allah condones cruelty and selfishness, and human beings who covet and kill in the name of the Supreme Being wreak shame upon our heavenly Father. Bishop Schori is a loving saint to be admired by all and a sensible diplomat to be encouraged and followed. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Martinsville, VA October 12, 2012 at 4:19 pm Amen. Curate Diocese of Nebraska Director of Music Morristown, NJ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York October 12, 2012 at 10:18 pm Well said, Bishop Katharine. A concise statement of the broad range of issues, and very timely.We shall be looking for the words in the campaign, and the ACTIONS later. Scott Lewis says: October 12, 2012 at 8:24 pm Amen. I am so glad to see Bishop Jefferts Schori take a stand. Rector Albany, NY Thomas R. Getman says: October 14, 2012 at 4:54 pm And let us say: Amen! Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Featured Jobs & Calls October 13, 2012 at 7:18 am Thank you, Bishop, for calling attention both to security concerns and to humanitarian concerns. May our prayers be fervent for healing of divisions within each people, with both of whom we share bonds of affection, so that a consensus for peace and an openness to compromise may emerge among both. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel October 15, 2012 at 12:34 pm The Presiding Bishop’s letter has much to commend it. It demonstrates a grasp of the realities that (a) a 2-State solution is the realistic alternative to perpetuation of an Israeli occupation which does nothing but harm to both peoples; and (b) that the United States can and should act to bring about the hoped-for peace. The letter is also sent to the right addresses, i.e., to the candidates for next President. It is the Executive who can take the needed actions on Israel/Palestine, as on foreign policy in general. In this respect, the letter contrasts with the communication sent to Congress by 15 “religious leaders,” some of whom are indeed leaders of denominations and some who have lesser standing. That letter, dispatched to the principal US bastion of pro-Israeli support, will predictably get at best a pro forma response. There will be no Congressional inquiry into possible Israeli violation of US laws regarding military aid. Unlike the writers of that letter, the Presiding Bishop recognizes what is possible: Movement toward compromise settlement–but not implied or actual criticism of Israeli behavior –even though that behavior is often deserving of criticism.The Presiding Bishop’s letter does share with the other letter one questionable aspect: Its timing. We are talking about one of the most notorious “Third Rails” of American politics. With the November election looming, the incentives not to address Israel/Palestine, or to stick to established policy generalities, are overwhelming. During the campaign, the candidates will say little meaningful about the subject. Nor, I think, should they. Action, not words, is what is needed, and words such as Bishop Schori has asked for prematurely stated could get in the way of what should be done. A letter to the President-elect once the November poll is over could be useful, particularly if it comes from a broad range of denominational leaders, but the churches probably can most usefully contribute by building support among their congregations for the kind of balanced approach envisioned by the Presiding Bishop in her letter. I wish I could agree completely with commentator Don Scott Elliott that Israel/Palestine is a “non-zero-sum game,” but as some other comments indicate, there is still far too much of Zero Sum, of polarized and uncompromising views, on both sides, and that remains to be overcome. October 13, 2012 at 10:32 am Thank you Presiding Bishop for your thoughtful appeal to President Obama and Governor Romney . It is a much needed addition to the conversation. An urgent concern is that Israeli government policy, to which you have alluded, seems to belie commitment to a two state solution as the remaining bits and pieces of Palestine are not a viable contiguous governable economic entity…even with promised land swaps. Thus despair “on the ground” is increasing volatility.With prayers for a soon just peace, Tom Getman Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MSlast_img read more

Former New York Mayor Ed Koch laid to rest in…

first_img Featured Jobs & Calls People April 16, 2016 at 4:24 am May God embrace him , due to the fact he was the Best Mayor of New York City ,he cared for all new Yorkers regardless of race, color ,or religious or political differences. Rector Albany, NY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Feb 4, 2013 Comments (1) William Perez says: Rector Martinsville, VA Comments are closed. Featured Events Former New York Mayor Ed Koch laid to rest in Trinity plot In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Tags Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Tampa, FL Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Obituary, Submit a Press Release Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA A headstone is seen bearing the name of former New York City mayor Ed Koch at a cemetery in New York, February 1, 2013. Koch, the voluble three-term mayor who helped bring New York back from the brink of fiscal ruin in the 1970s and came to embody the city with his wry, outspoken style, died on Friday at the age of 88. REUTERS/Eric Thayer[Episcopal News Service] Former New York City Mayor Ed Koch’s body was buried Feb. 4 in one of Trinity Wall Street’s cemetery plots.Koch, 88, who called himself a secular Jew, died Feb. 1 of congestive heart failure. His funeral was held Feb. 4 at Temple Emanu-El on the East Side of Manhattan. Current New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg and former U.S. President Bill Clinton were among those who eulogized the three-term mayor who helped New York rebound from fiscal troubles in the 1970s. Koch remained a visible icon of the city.“He is with us even now even though the snows of many winters are now destined to cover his grave,” Rabbi David Posner, the senior rabbi at Temple Emanu-El, said during the service, according to a New York Times report.Former New York Mayor Ed Koch.Koch’s grave will be in the Trinity Cemetery and Mausoleum at 155th and Riverside. The Rev. James Cooper, Trinity Wall Street’s rector, said Feb. 1 that Koch approached the church in 2008 about being buried in the cemetery.“We were glad to find a way to oblige, even though in-ground burials these days are quite rare,” Cooper said.The rector took Koch on a tour of the grounds and showed him where his grave would be in the non-denominational cemetery on a rise overlooking Amsterdam Avenue.Koch told the Times that he consulted with a number of rabbis to ensure that his plan was acceptable. “I was going to do it anyway, but it would be nice if it were doable traditionally,” he said, noting that he was advised to request that the gate nearest his plot be inscribed as “the gate for the Jews,” and the cemetery agreed.He was also instructed to have rails installed around his plot, so he ordered them.Koch’s grave site, which was prepared in 2009, also has a bench and some trees, and is a place that Koch said he hoped people would visit.It was widely reported that he paid $20,000 for the plot, which was one of the few left in all of Manhattan. Koch told the New York Times in 2008 that the purchase had been a good investment because the stock market, unlike the price of cemetery space, had since gone down.Besides, “the idea of leaving Manhattan permanently irritates me,” said Koch at the time.“I don’t want to leave Manhattan, even when I’m gone,” Koch told the Associated Press. “This is my home. The thought of having to go to New Jersey was so distressing to me.”He added that he hoped to not need the gravestone he had ordered for “another eight to 10 years.”The stone is engraved with English, Hebrew and transliteration versions of the Sh’ma Yisreal: “Hear O Israel, the Lord our God, the Lord is One.” Koch also chose to include the proclamation that Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl declared shortly before he was beheaded by Pakistani militants Feb. 1, 2002: “My father is Jewish. My mother is Jewish. I am Jewish.”The mayor told the Wall Street Journal that those words are “as important as the most holy of all statements in Jewish ritual,” adding that they ought to be said by Jews “every Saturday night.”The gravestone also says of Koch: “He was fiercely proud of his Jewish faith. He fiercely defended the City of New York, and he fiercely loved its people.Trinity Church acquired the land for the cemetery and mausoleum in 1842, after a seven year search, according to information here. Its other burial lands were nearly filled to capacity and the city had in 1823 forbidden interments south of Canal Street. Trinity continues to operate cemeteries at the Wall Street church and at St. Paul’s Chapel.The cemetery includes the graves of members of the Astor family; former Mayor Fernando Wood; New York Governor John Adams Dix; mistress of the Morris-Jumel Mansion, Eliza B. Jumel; author of the “Night Before Christmas” Clement Clarke Moore; and author Ralph Ellison. In 1893, the Academy of Sciences erected a monument over the grave of the naturalist artist John James Audubon who had lived on an estate bordering the land the cemetery occupies.— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Press Release Service Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Smithfield, NC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Collierville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Knoxville, TN Submit an Event Listing Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DClast_img read more

Francis is a pope of firsts

first_img Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Mar 13, 2013 Thomas Mansella says: Featured Events Ecumenical & Interreligious Nathaniel Queen says: Rector Martinsville, VA Featured Jobs & Calls TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit a Press Release Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Belleville, IL Comments (6) Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Collierville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Newly elected Pope Francis, Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio of Argentina, appears on the balcony of St. Peter’s Basilica after being elected by the conclave of cardinals, at the Vatican, March 13, 2013. White smoke rose from the Sistine Chapel chimney and the bells of St. Peter’s Basilica rang out on Wednesday, signaling that Roman Catholic cardinals had elected a pope to succeed Benedict XVI. Photo: Reuters/Dylan Martinez[Episcopal News Service] Argentinian Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio, 76, was elected March 13 by the cardinals of the Roman Catholic Church to succeed Pope Benedict XVI.Bergoglio, the first Jesuit and the first cardinal from Latin America ever to be elected pope, chose the name Francis.Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori said in a statement that the Episcopal Church “will pray for the new Bishop of Rome, Pope Francis I, and for the possibility of constructive dialogue and cooperation between our churches.”Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby also issued a statement. “We wish Pope Francis every blessing in the enormous responsibilities that he has assumed on behalf of Roman Catholics around the world,” he said, calling the new pontiff “a compassionate pastor of real stature who has served the poor in Latin America, and whose simplicity and holiness of life is remarkable.”While many observers assumed that Bergoglio took the name Francis in a signal he hopes to emulate the humility of the man who founded the Franciscan order, a man named Francis was significant in the early days of the Jesuits. Francis Xavier, one of the first seven Jesuits, was a student of Ignatius of Loyola, the founder of the Society of Jesus. Some consider the two to be the co-founders of the order. Early in their history, the Jesuits ran afoul of the pope, the Roman Curia and some nations more than once, but mostly for political and economic reasons rather than theological ones.Bergoglio had been archbishop of Buenos Aires since 1998. He was made a cardinal by Pope John Paul II in 2001. He is the first non-European to lead the Roman Catholic Church in more than 1,000 years, according to reports.Bergoglio was born in Buenos Aires to parents of Italian heritage. It is said that Bergoglio refused to live in the palatial bishop residence in Buenos Aires and took public transportation to work rather than ride in a limousine. He is also said to cook his own meals.The National Catholic Reporter reported in a profile 10 days before his election that Bergoglio was runner-up in the 2005 conclave that elected his predecessor, Benedict XVI.The CIA’s World Factbook says that Argentina is nominally a Roman Catholic nation with 92 percent claiming that affiliation and less than 20 percent practicing. About 39 percent of the world’s 1.2 billion Roman Catholics live in Latin America.White smoke billowed from the chimney atop the Sistine Chapel at 7:06 p.m. local time (2:06 p.m. EST) but Bergoglio did not appear publicly until more than an hour later.The bells of St. Peter’s Basilica started ringing and the thousands of people waiting in the rain in St. Peter’s Square began to cheer. Others began rushing to the square. The crowd – “that goes on as far as the eye can see,” according NBC news anchor Brian Williams — chanted “Viva il Papa” even before Bergoglio appeared.The first man who appeared on the balcony was Cardinal Jean-Louis Tauran, president of the Pontifical Council for Interreligious Dialogue in the Roman Curia, who announced “Habemus Papam” – “We have a pope” – and the Latin name Franciscus.Francis appeared on the balcony of St. Peter’s facade, known as the Loggia of the Blessings, about 8:20 p.m. (3:20 pm. EDT) to speak to the vast crowd and to give his first papal blessing.“First of all let us all pray for the pope emeritus,” he said early in his remarks, leading the crowd in the Lord’s Prayer and a Hail Mary. He spoke in Italian with what some recognized as a slight Spanish accent.“I ask a favor, before the bishop blesses the people, I ask the people to bless the bishop,” he said. He called for a moment of silence and bowed his head to the crowd.After giving his blessing, Francis said: “Thank you for the welcome. See you soon, tomorrow I want to pray to the Madonna. Good night and good rest.Retired New York Cardinal Timothy Eagan spoke about Francis on NBC news during the announcement. “He is a scholar but he is a scholar who knows how to talk to the folks in the parishes, and that’s where it’s at,” said Eagan, who was too old to vote in the conclave.Francis succeeds Benedict XVI, who ended his eight-year papacy Feb. 28, after announcing earlier that month that he was no longer up to the job’s demands. He became the first pontiff in 598 years to resign.Cardinals reached the required two-thirds majority, 77 votes, needed for the election of a new pope after two days of voting. Bergoglio apparently was elected on the fifth ballot.The conclave started on the afternoon of March 12 with a solemn ceremony in the Sistine Chapel following a special Mass in St. Peter’s Basilica, before the secret balloting began.— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Albany, NY Rector Smithfield, NC Shirley E. Viall says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Francis is a pope of firsts Jorge Mario Bergoglio is papacy’s first Jesuit, first Latin American, first Francis Comments are closed. Press Release Service Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis March 14, 2013 at 12:14 am A very wise and humble man of prayer. He likes to ride the subway and go to appointments on his own. Very ecumenical– Good news for Anglicans! The fact that he elected a name that no one has used before, tells that he will be his very own man. March 14, 2013 at 1:16 am A true model of St. Francis Xavier who has a heart for the people, for all people. We must pray for Pope Francis and for God’s guidance as he walks in the fisherman’s shoes. May God protect and keep him. March 16, 2013 at 10:27 am Thank you for the news that I recieved.As for our church and community,we are pleased this news to share and pray. Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 center_img Rector Tampa, FL Revd.Sanda Aung says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Tags March 13, 2013 at 5:18 pm I pray for the new Pope; for integrity, willingness to lesson not only to God but the whole body of the church, the people, and for him to be able to discern what is right and what is un acceptable as leader of a troubled church, reflective of this troubled world we live in. May God be with him in his new spiritual journey of leadership. Rector Washington, DC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit an Event Listing March 13, 2013 at 10:21 pm Am very stunned…a Latin and a Jesuit! A wait and watch will be the interesting part. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing AliceMarie Slaven-Emond says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Bath, NC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Knoxville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Curate Diocese of Nebraska In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET March 13, 2013 at 5:58 pm I pray to our Lord Jesus Christ that the Holy Spirt and the Grace of GOD ‘s HAnd Be apon this Man as he asumes the Position he has been appointed to, May his mind and Heart always be guided by love and honesty and rightiness to lead a troubled church and its people. I am glad to see a man as humble as we have been told to take this role and I in Christ service will pray for his sucess into the modern World. May GOD be Glorified in his Work ahead of him. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Dennis Verser says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NYlast_img read more