Shivpal Yadav-Yogi Adityanath meeting triggers speculation

first_imgSenior Samajwadi Party leader Shivpal Singh Yadav, who was sidelined in the party and government by nephew Akhilesh Yadav, met Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister Yogi Adityanath on Wednesday, fuelling speculation.The meeting, which lasted 30 minutes, is being termed in political corridors as “something more that a mere courtesy call”.According to sources, Mr. Shivpal Singh Yadav was mulling option beyond the Samajwadi Party, whose State president he was till he was dislodged by his nephew before the U.P. elections. Mr. Shivpal Singh Yadav is also reported to be trying to find a political future for his son Aditya Yadav as well, an insider said. This is the second meeting of a Yadav clan member with the BJP Chief Minister in the past few days.On March 15 and on March 31, Mr. Mulayam Singh Yadav’s younger son Prateek and his wife Aparna Yadav had met Mr. Adityanath. Political observers in Lucknow are speculating that there could be a major breach in the Yadav family with some people crossing over to the saffron camp.Even after the rout in the 2017 State Assembly elections, there has been no thaw in the relations between the Mulayam Singh Yadav and Akhilesh Yadav camps.In fact both Mr. Mulayam Singh Yadav and Mr. Shivpal Singh Yadav attacked Mr. Akhilesh Yadav recently and blamed his arrogance for the poll debacle. Ms. Aparna Yadav had also said that it was not the EVMs that were at fault but “our own” who had ensured her defeat from the Lucknow Cantonment seat.last_img read more

Beggars, Lamanis, spoiling Goan culture: Minister

first_imgPanaji: The Goa Tourism Minister, Manohar Ajgaonkar, wants to oust beggars and Lamanis (members of a nomadic tribe), from the beaches of the State as he believes they are spoiling Goa’s culture.Earlier this week, the Minister, who belongs to regional outfit Maharashtrawadi Gomantak Party (MGP), stirred a controversy when he said that Lamanis and beggars will be banned from the State as they don’t fit in its culture and Goenkarponn (Goanness or Goan identity).The Lamanis, known for their colourful attire, hail from Karnataka. They are usually seen selling balloons, trinkets, and handmade clothes on beaches.Protecting Goanness“Goa, Goans and Goenkarponn” was the key focus of development of Vijay Sardesai-led Goa Forward Party when it joined the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP)-led coalition government post-Assembly election. Ever since then, Chief Minister Manohar Parrikar and his Ministers have been talking about the need to protect Goanness.Mr. Ajgaonkar, while speaking to reporters on Monday, had said that his Ministry would take action against the Lamanis who are involved in illegal businesses. “Outsiders, who can uphold Goenkarponn should be allowed to stay, the rest should be chased away. These Lamanis should be stopped [from coming to the State]. A wrong message is sent because of them and the reputation of Goans is spoilt.”He also defined Goenkarponn with an example of “a drunk Goan,” who, according to Mr. Ajgaonkar, never misbehaves. “A drunk Goan will never make a scene on the street. You would not even know that he is drunk. That is Goan culture and Goenkarponn.” Tourism squadsTwo days after this press conference, the Minister proposed reviving Tourism Squads, which were defunct till now, as part of his mission to crackdown on illegal activities along the State’s coast. The squads comprise tourism officials and Indian Reserve Battalion (IRB) personnel. They will be tasked with sharing information on drug peddling and prostitution rackets to the Goa Police. Mr. Ajgaonkar has also said that the drug trade is flourishing in the State because the police were tacitly sympathetic to the activity. “Our officers know how the drugs are coming in [the State]. I will tell the CM that wherever drugs are found, the concerned officer of the area should be suspended.”The Minister said, “If the beggars, Lamanis, and hawkers carry out their business within legal parameters, and maintain the culture of the State, nobody will stop them [from doing their business on beaches].” The Tourism Department is also considering to issue ID-cards to beach shack employees to prevent Lamanis and hawkers from impersonating as shack staff during raids.North Goa Superintendent of Police Karthik Kashyap told The Hindu on Friday that the State police has never targeted people who do their work legally. He said the Goa Tourism Trade Act provides for ban on selling wares, like balloons, on beaches.last_img read more

‘Energy, resources should not be spent on VIP protection’

first_imgPanaji: Goa Chief Minister Manohar Parrikar on Wednesday said energy and resources should not be spent on protection of VIPs, barring the Prime Minister and the President.Following the Union Cabinet’s decision to ban red beacons on VIP cars on Wednesday, the CM said he would stop using it. “I believe that VIP culture has to be reduced. It is a wrong thing that is happening to this country. Security is a mindset. Security can be achieved with two, three, or four people,” Mr. Parrikar told reporters at a media briefing after the Cabinet meeting at the State Secretariat.Later in the day, two Ministers in the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP)-led coalition government: Minister for Tourism Manohar Ajgaonkar and Water Resources Minister Vinod Paliyekar, said they had removed red beacons from their official cars, following the Central Cabinet’s decision.Mr. Parrikar also asked officials in the CMO to issue instructions for implementation of the decision.last_img read more

Two MICA students drown at Candolim

first_imgPANAJI: Two students of the Mudra Institute of Communications, Ahmedabad (MICA), drowned at Candolim in north coastal Goa in the early hours of Thursday, after they were dragged inwards by the current. The students have been identified as Gurram Chenchu Sai (25) from Andhra Pradesh and Anuja Susan Paul (23) from Chennai. Around 8.15 a.m. on Thursday, a fisherman near the Sinquerim tower spotted a body floating around 100 metres out at sea and immediately alerted Drishti Lifeguards. The body was retrieved and after the intervention of the Calangute police, associate professor Pravin Mishra from MICA identified the body as that of Gurram Chenchu. It was later handed over to the police. Mr. Mishra and faculty member Nitesh Mohanty informed the police that they and 47 students had come to Goa on a five-day study trip. Around 3 a.m., seven students from the group headed to Candolim beach and ventured into the sea. Anuja was found unconscious minutes after the incident. She was immediately shifted to the Candolim Primary Health Centre, where she was declared dead on arrival. Girish Padlotkar from the Calangute police station said the bodies were sent to the State-owned Goa Medical College Hospital for post mortem.Drishti Lifeguards, which mans the coastal belt, issued an advisory cautioning beach-goers from wading into the sea in unsafe situations, and especially after sunset.last_img read more

Ultra behind attack on J&K Minister held

first_imgA Jaish-e-Muhammad (JeM) militant, believed to be behind the recent attack on the Jammu & Kashmir Public Works Minister Nayeem Akhtar, was arrested on Friday.According to the police, the JeM militant, Gulzar Ahmad Dar, who lobbed a grenade at a bus stand in Tral on September 21, which left three civilians dead and 30 injured, was held in a cordon-and-search operation at Naristan village in Tral.Chinese pistol seizedA Chinese pistol was recovered from him, said the police. “During sustained questioning, he [Dar] admitted that he had hurled the grenade on the instructions of the JeM commander, Mufti Vikas, a resident of Pakistan, and Noor Mohammad Tantray, a resident of Darganie-Gund in Tral,” the police said.Dar, according to the police, was earlier active with the JeM outfit in 2014.He was arrested and released after two years in January 2017.In a follow-up of the investigation, security forces came to know about the presence of his associates, all foreign militants, “in a hideout in Tral’s Pastuna forest”.However, the militants fired upon the search party from their hideout and took advantage of the dense forest cover to escape, said the police.Second bank robberyGunmen looted ₹1.9 lakh from a bank in Pulwama’s Ratnipora area on Friday morning, the second such incident in the past 24 hours.Three masked gunmen barged into the branch at Ratnipora and decamped with cash. The gunmen also damaged the CCTV cameras before looting the cash.On Thursday, ₹5 lakh was looted from a bank in the Bijbehara area of Anantnag. The police blamed the Hizbul Mujhadeen for these acts.However, the Hizb distanced itself from the bank robberies. “We do not believe in bank robberies as it is un-Islamic and unethical. Robbing banks is not the work of militants,” said Hizb operational spokesperson Burhanuddin on Friday.last_img read more

‘Arunachal people against citizenship to refugees’

first_imgThe All-Arunachal Pradesh Students’ Union has made it clear to the Centre that people of the State will not accept citizenship to Chakma and Hajong refugees at any cost, an AAPSU release stated on Friday.The students’ body attended the Joint High Power Committee meeting on the vexed Chakma-Hajong issue in New Delhi on Thursday, which was chaired by Joint Secretary (Northeast) Satyendra Garg, the release said.AAPSU president Hawa Bagang told representatives of the Union Home Ministry that citizenship to the Chakma-Hajong refugees “will never be acceptable to the people of Arunachal Pradesh”.He also highlighted the “atrocities committed by the refugees against the indigenous people” and doubted the Centre’s “sincerity in resolving the issue”, the release said.The student body’s general secretary Tobom Dai told the Chakma-Hajong delegations, that also took part in the meeting, to consider citizenship outside the territory of Arunachal Pradesh without preconditions.“Unrelenting attitude (of the Chakma-Hajongs) asking for citizenship within Arunachal Pradesh will boomerang and the people of the State will never accept it,” Mr. Dai said.Meeting heldThe meeting was convened as a follow-up to AAPSU’s demand in June last year here, seeking an early solution to the contentious refugee issue, the release added. An all-party meeting convened by CM Pema Khandu on June 19, 2017, had decided to move the Union Home Ministry to revive the Joint High Powered Committee on the refugee issue.last_img read more

Odisha plans to set up 17 digital dispensaries in Ganjam

first_imgSeventeen digital dispensaries are going to be established in remote and inaccessible areas of Odisha’s Ganjam district to provide primary medical support.The digital dispensaries will provide outpatient department services through online video consultation with doctors. The units will also serve as basic pathological testing laboratories and generic medicine-dispensing centres.A pharmacist will manage the dispensary and patients will be able to video-chat with the doctor. The pharmacist will upload required pathological test reports to the consulting doctor and will also dispense medicines as prescribed by the physician.In March, the State health department had asked all District Collectors to provide a list of possible locations for digital dispensaries.Inaccessible areas The digital dispensary project aims to establish units in remote and inaccessible areas that have no Primary Health Centre within a 5-km radius.The office of the Ganjam Chief District Medical Officer stated that they had listed 35 unserved or underserved locations for establishment of ‘digital dispensaries’ in the district. The department, however, approved only 17 locations.These 17 proposed digital dispensaries will be established in seven out of the 22 blocks of Ganjam district. Four will be set up in Sanakhemund, five in Surada, two each in Khallikote, Buguda and Beguniapada; and one each in Kavisuryanagar and Chikit.Officials of the health department said that the process to establish the dispensaries has started, but fast and steady Internet connectivity is still a major problem in some of the proposed locations in Ganjam. Similar initiatives have been launched in Keonjhar and Nabarangpur districts.last_img read more

Punjab govt. approves new sand, gravel mining policy

first_imgThe Punjab government on Wednesday approved policy changes to enable the government to grant contracts by auction of mining blocks in strategically established clusters through progressive bidding instead of the earlier process of auction by individual mines.The move is aimed at increasing the royalty receipt of the State exchequer, provide adequate supply at fair price to the consumer, and curb illegal mining.An official statement said it was also decided that the department of Mining would launch an online Punjab Sand Portal for sale of sand to all consumers, small or medium. “All transactions-payments will be captured through online real-time monitoring system. The sale of sand would be controlled by electronic documentation linked to central documentation, with modern facility, and the daily progress report would be uploaded on the portal,” added the statement.Notably, during 2017-18, four e-auctions of minor mineral mines were held. Due to speculative bidding in these auctions, it resulted in a significant number of mines being auctioned at very high prices. However, many of the contractors failed to operationalise these mines, which led to dearth of supply of sand and gravel, causing the market price of these commodities to remain high.Surrender of licencesThe Cabinet also approved a policy to allow promoters to surrender the licences in case they are unable to develop colonies or complete development works in colonies.“The policy was necessitated in view of the difficulties faced by such promoters,” said the statement, adding that these promoters will now be able surrender the licences issued to them under the Punjab Apartment and Property Regulation Act, 1995, subject to certain conditions.The Cabinet also gave its nod for an ordinance to amend Schedule 1-A of Indian Stamp Act, 1899, to enable increase in the stamp duty rates. It also decided to amend the industrial and business development policy of 2017 to give investment incentive by way of net SGST on intra-State sale.last_img read more

CM refuses to table Maratha report, Opposition fumes

first_img“Our government is providing educational benefits to the backward communities among Muslims. For Congress and NCP, Muslims are just a vote bank and they never cared for their well-being,” he said.The Opposition objected to Mr. Fadnavis’ reply and the House had to be adjourned for 10 minutes. After it regrouped, Opposition members charged in the well of the House and shouted slogans for the tabling of the Maratha and Dhangar reports and restoring 5% reservation in education to Muslims.Leader of Opposition Radhakrishna Vikhe-Patil said the earlier 51 reports of the Commission were not tabled in the Legislature since no demand was made for it. As sloganeering continued, the government cleared nine bills without discussion.Mr. Vikhe-Patil and Nationalist Congress Party (NCP) leader Ajit Pawar accused Mr. Fadnavis of keeping even the senior ministers of the State cabinet in the dark about the report. “Various people are saying different things and this will settle only if the report is tabled. If there is nothing to hide, what is the problem in making it public?” Mr. Pawar asked.The Opposition boycotted proceedings and returned only after BJP leader Eknath Khadse appealed to the Chief Minister to call them for a discussion on drought. Chief Minister Devendra Fadnavis on Tuesday refused to table the State Backward Class Commission (SBCC) report on Maratha reservation in the Assembly, despite repeated demands by the Opposition. He claimed that the Opposition was trying to pit communities against each other through their protest. The issue had stalled the Assembly proceedings for four days with the Opposition demanding the report be made public. On Tuesday, Mr. Fadnavis met with Opposition leaders and no consensus was reached. As the Opposition continued with their demand, Mr. Fadnavis said in the Assembly that if the former tried to politicise the issue, his government would also respond politically. “My government is committed to providing reservation to the Marathas under the Socially and Educationally Backward Community category over and above the existing 52% reservation in the State,” Mr. Fadnavis said. The government will table the ‘action taken report’ (ATR) on the Commission’s recommendations in the Assembly, before introducing a bill, he said.“As per rules under which the SBCC has been set up, only the ATR on its recommendations is tabled in the House. This is the 52nd report of the Commission and the earlier 51 reports were not tabled in the Legislature,” he said.We will also table the ATR on the Tata Institute of Social Sciences report on Dhangar reservation, Mr. Fadnavis said. “Reservations of the Scheduled Tribes (STs) will be protected. Recommendations of the TISS report will be sent to the Centre and reservation will be given without hurting the existing quota for STs.”Criticising the Congress and the Nationalist Congress Party (NCP) over the issue of quota for Muslims, Mr. Fadnavis accused them of trying to mislead the community. “52 backward castes among Muslims were given reservation by the previous Shiv Sena-BJP State government (in the 90s). To give reservation, the castes need to be declared backward first. Those demanding quota should first approach the State Backward Class Commission, and their report will be binding on the government,” he said.last_img read more

Occultist seeks permission for human sacrifice

first_imgAn occultist here has sent the Begusarai authorities into a tizzy with an “application” seeking permission for human sacrifice to propitiate his deity. In a video that was shared widely, the occultist purportedly claimed that human sacrifice is not a crime and he is going to sacrifice his son, an engineer, first. Surendra Prasad Singh, who resides in Mohanpur Pahadpur village under Mofussil Police Station area, wrote the letter to Sub Divisional Officer (Sadar), Begusarai, on January 29. Screenshots of the purported letter have gone viral on social media, but the SDO Sanjiv Chaudhary said he had not received it. “This is a serious matter. Human sacrifice is illegal. We have launched a hunt for the letter as well as the tantrik. Appropriate action will be taken,” he said.last_img

A fight among Kondh leaders in Koraput

first_imgIt will be a triangular contest among Kondh tribal leaders in Odisha’s Koraput Lok Sabha seat, which is reserved for Scheduled Tribes (ST).Kaushalya Hikaka, wife of sitting MP Jhina Hikaka, is the BJD candidate, while the Congress has fielded Saptagiri Sankar Ulaka, son of former State Minister Ramchandra Ulaka. Former BJD Koraput MP Jayaram Pangi is the BJP candidate. All of them are from the Kondh community. According to an estimate, the constituency has around 47% Kondh tribals.Apart from these three, Bhaskar Mutuka of the BSP, Samodar Sabar of the CPI-ML (Liberation), Banamali Majhi of the Ambedkarite Party of India and Rajendra Kendruka of the CPI-ML (Red Star) are also in the fray.In 2014, Mr. Hikaka had defeated Congress candidate Giridhar Gamang, former Odisha Chief Minister and nine-time MP from Koraput. His wife Hema Gamang, as Congress candidate, had won the 1999 by-election when Mr. Gamang vacated the seat to become the Chief Minister.Mr. Gamang, a Saura tribal, the second largest tribal populace in this constituency, is now in the BJP and is expected to add to the tribal support for Mr. Pangi. Interestingly, in the 2009 Lok Sabha poll, Mr. Pangi as a BJD candidate had defeated Mr. Gamang, then in the Congress.Since its inception in 1957, Koraput remained a Congress bastion till 2004. In 2014, the seat was bagged by the BJD, yet three of its Assembly seats in Koraput district — Jeypore, Laxmipur and Koraput — went to the Congress. The Congress is trying hard to regain its old bastion. The other four Assembly seats in this constituency — Pottangi in Koraput district and Gunupur, Bisamkatak, Rayagada in Rayagada district — went to the BJD. The BJP is also eyeing this parliamentary seat, hoping to gain from the loss of support base of the Congress.last_img read more

‘BHU student killer’ held, say police

first_imgA wanted criminal, who was on the run after allegedly killing a BHU student, has been arrested following an exchange of fire with the police. A sub-inspector was also injured in the encounter, the police said. Acting on a tip-off, the police had cordoned the Lanka area here on Friday night. The notorious criminal, Rupesh Verma alias Sunny alias Professor, a native of Buxar in Bihar, was nabbed when he tried to flee by opening fire at the police team, Senior Superintendent of Police Anand Kulkarni said. Verma, who was carrying a reward of ₹25,000, received bullet injuries in the leg and fell off the motorcycle which he had looted a few days ago on the national highway, the SSP added. One of his companions, Raja Dubey alias Ravan, managed to give a slip to the police.last_img

ScienceShot: First Example of Tool Use in Reptiles

first_imgAs predators go, there are lots of reasons to respect alligators and crocodiles. They hide patiently for hours, then launch a sudden attack with the strongest bite on the planet. Now, add cleverness to the list. In what appears to be the first example of tool use among reptiles, researchers have discovered that both animals use twigs and sticks to attract nest-building birds. In 2007, behavioral ecologist Vladimir Dinets noticed that mugger crocodiles (Crocodylus palustris) at a zoo in India would balance small sticks on their snouts near a rookery where egrets compete for sticks to build their nests. Once, one of the crocs lunged at an egret that approached. Intrigued, Dinets studied alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) at four sites in Louisiana. The alligators put sticks on their snouts (upper photo) much more frequently near egret rookeries and during the nest-building season, he and colleagues report online in Ethology Ecology & Evolution. Although Dinets, now at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, observed only one attack over a year, two co-authors who have worked for 13 years at a wildlife park in Florida have seen multiple attacks (lower photo) after alligators lured birds with sticks. “It does not surprise me at all,” says J. Whitfield Gibbons, a retired herpetologist, speaking on his cell phone from a swamp near his cabin in Aiken, South Carolina. “Alligators are amazing creatures.”See more ScienceShots.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

Study of massive preprint archive hints at the geography of plagiarism

first_imgNew analyses of the hundreds of thousands of technical manuscripts submitted to arXiv, the repository of digital preprint articles, are offering some intriguing insights into the consequences—and geography—of scientific plagiarism. It appears that copying text from other papers is more common in some nations than others, but the outcome is generally the same for authors who copy extensively: Their papers don’t get cited much.Since its founding in 1991, arXiv has become the world’s largest venue for sharing findings in physics, math, and other mathematical fields. It publishes hundreds of papers daily and is fast approaching its millionth submission. Anyone can send in a paper, and submissions don’t get full peer review. However, the papers do go through a quality-control process. The final check is a computer program that compares the paper’s text with the text of every other paper already published on arXiv. The goal is to flag papers that have a high likelihood of having plagiarized published work.”Text overlap” is the technical term, and sometimes it turns out to be innocent. For example, a review article might quote generously from a paper the author cites, or the author might recycle and slightly update sentences from their own previous work. The arXiv plagiarism detector gives such papers a pass. “It’s a fairly sophisticated machine learning logistic classifier,” says arXiv founder Paul Ginsparg, a physicist at Cornell University. “It has special ways of detecting block quotes, italicized text, text in quotation marks, as well statements of mathematical theorems, to avoid false positives.”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Only when there is no obvious reason for an author to have copied significant chunks of text from already published work—particularly if that previous work is not cited and has no overlap in authorship—does the software affix a “flag” to the article, including links to the papers from which it has text overlap. That standard “is much more lenient” than those used by most scientific journals, Ginsparg says.To explore some of the consequences of “text reuse,” Ginsparg and Cornell physics Ph.D. student Daniel Citron compared the text from each of the 757,000 articles submitted to arXiv between 1991 and 2012. The headline from that study, published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) is that the more text a paper poaches from already published work, the less frequently that paper tends to be cited. (The full paper is also available for free on arXiv.) It also found that text reuse is surprisingly common. After filtering out review articles and legitimate quoting, about one in 16 arXiv authors were found to have copied long phrases and sentences from their own previously published work that add up to about the same amount of text as this entire article. More worryingly, about one out of every 1000 of the submitting authors copied the equivalent of a paragraph’s worth of text from other people’s papers without citing them.So where in the world is all this text reuse happening? Conspicuously missing from the PNAS paper is a global map of potential plagiarism. Whenever an author submits a paper to arXiv, the author declares his or her country of residence. So it should be possible to reveal which countries have the highest proportion of plagiarists. The reason no map was included, Ginsparg told ScienceInsider, is that all the text overlap detected in their study is not necessarily plagiarism.Ginsparg did agree, however, to share arXiv’s flagging data with ScienceInsider. Since 1 August 2011, when arXiv began systematically flagging for text overlap, 106,262 authors from 151 nations have submitted a total of 301,759 articles. (Each paper can have many more co-authors.) Overall, 3.2% (9591) of the papers were flagged. It’s not just papers submitted en masse by a few bad apples, either. Those flagged papers came from 6% (6737) of the submitting authors. Put another way, one out of every 16 researchers who have submitted a paper to arXiv since August 2011 has been flagged by the plagiarism detector at least once.The map above, prepared by ScienceInsider, takes a conservative approach. It shows only the incidence of flagged authors for the 57 nations with at least 100 submitted papers, to minimize distortion from small sample sizes. (In Ethiopia, for example, there are only three submitting authors and two of them have been flagged.)Researchers from countries that submit the lion’s share of arXiv papers—the United States, Canada, and a small number of industrialized countries in Europe and Asia—tend to plagiarize less often than researchers elsewhere. For example, more than 20% (38 of 186) of authors who submitted papers from Bulgaria were flagged, more than eight times the proportion from New Zealand (five of 207). In Japan, about 6% (269 of 4759) of submitting authors were flagged, compared with over 15% (164 out of 1054) from Iran.Such disparities may be due in part to different academic cultures, Ginsparg and Citron say in their PNAS study. They chalk up scientific plagiarism to “differences in academic infrastructure and mentoring, or incentives that emphasize quantity of publication over quality.”*Correction, 11 December, 4:57 p.m.:  The map has been corrected to reflect current national boundaries.last_img read more

Very, very dull: What happened to India’s white-hot cryptocurrency market

first_imgA chill has set into the cryptocurrency market, especially in India.Tightening regulation and policy ambiguity have sucked the life out of trading in the past few months, though industry insiders say the phase may be temporary.“The market is very, very dull,” said Sathvik Vishwanath, co-founder and CEO of Unocoin, a bitcoin exchange.Read it at Quartz Related Itemslast_img